gay-adoption

FOR Gay Adoption

AGAINST Gay Adoption

1 – EQUAL RIGHTS MEANS JUST THAT

Civilized societies do not discriminate on grounds of race, creed, gender or sexuality, yet the denial of equal rights to gay couples is clear discrimination. Gay and heterosexual couples deserve the same legal rights to adopt. Anything less is pure inequality based on homophobia. In some countries gay individuals can adopt as single parents, but gay couples can’t. That is absurd. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights says clearly “all are equal before the law … all are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination.” A growing number of countries are waking up to this reality.

1 – LET EACH COUNTRY DECIDE FOR ITSELF

One of the fundamental principles of the European Union is subsidiarity. That means that the EU should only have a role on issues that cannot be more effectively carried out at a national or local level. Gay adoption is clearly an issue that is best decided on a country-by-country basis, without rushing citizens in more traditional societies.

2. LGBT COUPLES MAKE GREAT PARENTS

There is ample evidence to show that gay couples can be just as good at parenting as straight couples. In fact, some believe homosexual couples on average tend to be better motivated and more committed than heterosexual parents, because they always chose to have children – unlike the around 50 percent of straight couple who stumble into parenthood by accident. Many gay couples form relationships that are more stable than many heterosexual marriages giving adopted children a secure, emotionally stable home.

2. RELIGIOUS AND MORAL VALUES

Gay parenting runs fundamentally counter to many people’s religious views. Legalising it would offend cherished beliefs and further undermine the key role religion plays as a moral bedrock in society. Christian, Jewish and Islamic leaders have all spoken out against gay marriage.

3. KIDS NEED FAMILIES

Children adopted by gay couples weren’t snatched from happy hetero families. Most will come from orphanages, foster homes or single mums unable to cope. Many are from poor countries. The family, gay or straight, is better than the alternatives. Given the shortage of suitable straight couples, gay adoption can provide kids the loving homes they need. That’s good for children, good for couples wanting to raise a child and good for society. There are now around 65,000 children who have found homes thanks to gay adoption legislation in the United States.

3. A DEMOCRATIC DECISION

Democracy doesn’t always achieve the outcome you want. Yet we have to respect the democratic decision of people who vote for politicians and governments that oppose gay adoption. They are the elected representatives of their societies and we should accept that, even if we disagree with what they have to say.

4. BREAKING DOWN PREJUDICES

Societies that embrace diversity are stronger and better off. Children raised by gay couples may have different outlooks – surveys in the US have shown they grow up more tolerant and open-minded. That can only be good. Lifting bans on gay marriage or gay adoption are steps towards more diverse, more tolerant societies, where nobody faces discrimination. “Now we’re on the right side of history,” said Portuguese gay rights campaigner Isabel Advirta, after parliament approved the gay adoption law in December.

4. SHUTTING DOORS

Faith-based adoption agencies play a vital role in ensuring orphaned, abandoned and deprived children can find loving homes. Many will simply give up rather than be forced by the law to hand children over to same-sex couples. It’s already happening: Catholic agencies in Britain and the United States have shut shop in the wake of laws that would have obliged them to send children to gay couples. Enforcing legalisation will make if more difficult for needy children to find the families they need.


Want to debate this question with others? Join our debate “Should all EU states recognise gay adoption?” and add your thoughts in the comment section!

IMAGE CREDITS: CC / Flickr – Michael Verhoef