FOR EUTHANASIA

AGAINST EUTHANASIA

1. RIGHT TO SELF-DETERMINATION

Human beings should be free to make decisions about their own lives, which includes the time and manner of their death. This is especially true if they are facing a terminal illness from which there is no chance of recovery. Euthanasia lets someone have agency over fate by leaving this world on their own terms with their affairs in order if they so wish, allowing for a ‘good’ death.

1. DEVALUATION OF LIFE

Euthanasia weakens society’s respect for the sanctity of life. Voluntary euthanasia is the start of a slippery slope that leads to involuntary euthanasia and the killing of people who are thought to be undesirable in society. All human beings are to be valued, irrespective of age, sex, race, religion, social status or their potential for achievement, and euthanasia leaves open various dangerous loopholes for exploitation, leading to the disposability of human existence.

2. DIE WITH DIGNITY

Euthanasia enables a person to die with dignity, granting the opportunity for a peaceful, merciful death for a terminally ill, mentally competent adult. Family and friends are spared the traumatic grief of seeing their loved one suffer a long-drawn-out death. For the patient, it alleviates unnecessary suffering, frees them from what may be painful treatment, and allows them to die with dignity.

2. AGAINST THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH

To ask that doctors, nurses or any other health professional carry out euthanasia or assist in a suicide would be a violation of fundamental medical ethics, namely the Hippocratic oath, in which medics foremostly pledge to do no harm. In addition to allocating God-like power to medics, it damages the trust between patient and doctor.

3. IT CAN BE REGULATED

Making euthanasia legal allows it to be regulated by governments. The truth is that euthanasia will always continue to take place, even if it’s illegal. At least if it’s legal then the process can be controlled, including proper safeguards and checks to ensure this is really what the person wants.

3. FEAR OF BECOMING A BURDEN

Some people may feel pressured by family, friends or doctors to request euthanasia, when it isn’t what they really want. It places pressure on vulnerable people such as elderly, disabled, sick or mentally ill, to end their lives out of fear of being a burden upon relatives or carers, especially in cases where families are under financial pressure.

IMAGE CREDITS: (cc) Flickr – Alberto Biscalchin