Angela Merkel is the most successful politician since World War Two. Whether you love her or loathe her, the German Chancellor has consistently been ranked one of the world’s most powerful women (often occupying the top spot) since she first took office in 2005. She has been described by TIME magazine as the “de facto leader of the European Union”. Her approval rating in Germany stands at 84% despite being in power for over 16 years. In fact, she holds record high approval ratings even outside of Germany.

In 2018, Chancellor Merkel announced she would not run for reelection in 2021. Federal elections are scheduled for September, and Merkel’s Christian Democrats (CDU) are due to elect a new party leader at a virtual congress starting on Friday 15 January. The new party leader is likely (though not guaranteed) to also become the CDU’s candidate for chancellor. So, as her party picks her successor, how should we assess the outgoing Chancellor Merkel’s legacy?

What will be Merkel’s legacy? Will history remember the German Chancellor as a cautious pragmatist? A shrewd political survivor? How has she managed to stay in power for 15 years? Has she made the right calls in the three major crises she has managed: the Eurozone crisis, the refugee crisis, and the coronavirus pandemic? Let us know your thoughts and comments in the form below and we’ll take them to policymakers and experts for their reactions!

Image Credits: (c) Bundesregierung/Denzel


12 comments Post a commentcomment

What do YOU think?

  1. avatar
    Peter

    If you mean cautious as slow and behind the developments yes , if you mean pragmatist as making money for the banks from the problems of the people yes , for example sell guns to turkey make war to Syria and then develop and use the refugee problem , smart policy but not humane

  2. avatar
    Boris

    She did bad in all three crisis. But the migrant crisis is her worst. Germany will pay for that very expensively. The EU has greater power then ever since Britain left and now we will pay European dept in the decades that coming. Terrible.

  3. avatar
    Vivian

    No morals, as EU member states have been abandoned to the region’s Islamist bandit. Merkel could be a leader for banks but not for the EU.

  4. avatar
    Robin

    Europe was sold to China and Russia.

  5. avatar
    Michael

    Imperfect leader, but the best we had at that juncture. She made mistakes. She has gotten better with time.

  6. avatar
    Julia

    Greek Cypriots will remember her for 100% supporting a Turkish dictator for Germany’s profits.

  7. avatar
    Franco

    ” A cautious pragmatist ” ? Oh yes. The refugee crisis ? Still to be solved and never will be. EU cannot afford more Brexiters.

  8. avatar
    Yvonne

    Amazing lady..i have much respect for her..she is so strong..and yet quietly works behind the scenes

  9. avatar
    Jesper Jørgensen

    I think and hope she will rememberers as a clever, proficient and pragmatic leader. I believe, that she has been able to stay in power for so long, due to the fact, that she is calm, fair and sensible even in difficult situations. She also makes people feel secure, since she usually gives clear statements on the issue at hand – while keeping in touch with her humanity. She also seems decent, which it not a given in leaders anymore.

    I wish her the very best and would like to thank her for a job well done making. She, her colleagues and the German people has made Germany a beacon in the european union and an inspiration for the rest of us.

  10. avatar
    José

    The destruction of European culture and the massive import of terrorism.

  11. avatar
    Kahraman Marangoz

    In those 15 years Angela is not the Angela who she was in the first year. She grew over those 15 years, where not easy to handle situations emerged, three major crisises. She made decisions, she lead with heart and brain, rational as emotional, in a balanced way.

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