citiesrefugees_d4

Refugees and asylum seekers are often portrayed as a burden for society. Yet, over the short term, might they provide a fiscal boost as government spending goes up (something the IMF has been calling for in Germany, for example). Over the longer term, could refugees help promote more dynamic economies, helping to offset Europe’s ageing population and shrinking labour force?

In order to take a closer look at the local impact of the refugee crisis, we recently launched our ‘Cities & Refugees‘ project – aimed at fostering a Europe-wide dialogue between citizens, refugees and asylum seekers, NGOs, politicians, and European leaders. The emphasis will be on connecting local, everyday life at the city level to decisions made in Brussels and national capitals.

Europe has to get this right first time. Failure to integrate refugees into the labour market could drive up unemployment and government debt, but successful integration policies might make all the difference. The question of how European governments handle such a transition over the coming years will be key.

Should rules be changed to make it easier for refugees and asylum seekers to start working legally? Should more be invested in classes to support refugees in learning the local language? Should a better framework be put in place to recognise qualifications from education institutes in refugees’ home countries?

This week, we’re looking at Vienna. Austria is one of the European countries standing to benefit the most from an increase in GDP in the short term, somewhere in the region of 0.5% (compared to a 0.31% fiscal cost to support refugees and asylum seekers in 2016).

Curious to know more about how the refugee crisis is impacting Europe’s economy? We’ve put together some facts and figures in the infographic below (click for a bigger version).

4-e4c-economy_update

We had a comment sent in by Aryan, who argues that the influx of refugees has a very positive on the host country, not least from an economic point of view. Is he right to be so optimistic?

To get a response, we took Aryan’s comment to Jonathan Portes, Director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR), an independent research institution based in the UK. What would he say to Aryan?

portesIn the short term, [the influx of refugees] probably will have some small positive impact, because governments have to spend more money to provide for refugees in the short term. And at the moment, with Europe’s economy still in a relatively sluggish state, a bit more government spending is actually a good thing (as we’ve seen in Germany and Sweden).

In the longer term, however, it depends entirely on how successfully countries can integrate refugees into the economy, society, and the labour market. If countries do a good job and are successful at integrating refugees, it will definitely be a benefit. If, on the other hand, refugees end up excluded, unemployed, etc., then it will not be a good thing at all.

We also had a comment from Mihai, who suggested that the (statistically younger) refugee population could help ease Europe’s coming demographic crisis, and that refugees should be seen as a potential “workforce to pay the pensions for an ageing population in the years to come”.

How would Jonathan Portes respond?

portesIn principle, I would agree. If refugees are successfully integrated into German society, and hence into the economy and labour market, then it will undoubtedly be an economic boost for Germany over the long term. It will also help Germany to address some of its demographic issues. It is an ‘if’, though. It’s not always easy to integrate people; they will have to be taught the language, they will have to be taught to navigate the local labour market, and both refugees and German society will have to adapt. If that can be done, however, then it will be an economic boost.

Will the refugee crisis boost Europe’s economy? Will they help Europe better cope with an ageing population? How can refugees best be integrated into the labour market? Let us know your thoughts and comments in the form below, and we’ll take them to policymakers and experts for their reactions!

IMAGE CREDITS: CC / Flickr – ILO Arab States

EU_for_citizens

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsi­ble for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.


148 comments Post a commentcomment

What do YOU think?

  1. avatar
    Bobi Dochev

    No, they cant, see how many migrants are recruited from those 8-900 000 in Germany and in what position.

    • avatar
      Jean-Pierre Rosa

      They will work in other sectors and always generate revenue, even if their tax returns are low. Does everything you say need to be corrected ? Look at the US situation; despite their status, illegals / immigrants / refugees generate more wealth than they cost.

    • avatar
      Bobi Dochev

      Dont correct me when you are not right!

      Financial times said:
      Survey reveals Germany’s top 30 companies employ just 54 refugees (These are the DAX Companies with millions employees) despite the over 650 000 free positions on the job market. Fifty of them were hired by one company, Deutsche Post (public company ruled by the government).

      According to official statistics, of the nearly 300,000 refugees currently registered as looking for work (nerally 1 million arrived in Germany but only 300 000 look for work), 74 % have had no vocational training and a quarter do not even have a school-leaving certificate. 9% cent have some degree.

      There were other information, I believe by the Member of the Essen Parliament, who says that survey of the Centre for Educational Economy in Munch show that 2/3 of the migrants are functionally illiterates.

      There is no big chance this people to find job, some of them going to find low-paid job, but this also doesn’t help for any kind of integration.
      Put also the social and religions difference and you have MISSION IMPOSSIBLE.

      Don’t look US there are migrants from countries with well developed educational systems and people with vocational training including a lot of migrants form the Western Europe. The situation with the migrants from African country is not the same – it is not even close!

      Nobody want that kind of worker!
      https://www.facebook.com/domesticforeignworldnews/videos/662413123939939/ ;)

    • avatar
      Stephen Pockley

      Jean-Pierre Rosa you just got owned there matey.

    • avatar
      Jean-Pierre Rosa

      Stephen Pockley thank you tinker bell, except None of what he said is even remotely true.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Jean-Pierre Rosa
      It looks like you have been well and truly ‘spanked’.

      Might I suggest a bit more logic on your part and less emotional and irrational aggression – it might help you when debating on this forum.

  2. avatar
    Eugenia Serban

    They ve “boosted” everything for the past 3-4 years since they started flooding Europe with millions

    • avatar
      Fernando Nabais

      Especially terrorism, crime and rapes. We need more of that.

  3. avatar
    Ivan Burrows

    .

    What ?!, could millions of low skilled cheap labour migrants improve the EU’s economy ???!!

    Its more likely to push up unemployment & drain the economy when it can’t cope with the Brussels created mess it is already in.

    • avatar
      Vinko Rajic

      Islamic science and our smart Christians are always our pioneers . Thanks to them we have modern science , solar panels , electric cars , we know how to build and protect environment . They build and financed huge factories in China to build electric cars and solar panels . Do you know why in China , because we atheist in the EU did everything to prevent them to develop , atheist wanted to export oil and burn fossil fuels , only to make big money , greed . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2pRGuY0WxE

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Vinko Rajic
      Ah, you are clearly a proponent of 2 + 2 4!

  4. avatar
    Vinko Rajic

    Islamic science and our smart Christians are always our pioneers . Thanks to them we have modern science , solar panels , electric cars , we know how to build and protect environment . They build and financed huge factories in China to build electric cars and solar panels . Do you know why in China , because we atheist in the EU did everything to prevent them to develop , atheist wanted to export oil and burn fossil fuels , only to make big money , greed . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2pRGuY0WxE

    • avatar
      Samhein

      You have to remember that religion has often been the enemy of science…

    • avatar
      Samhein

      If you isolate the problem solely to untrained workers you can address that over time, but it takes time and millions of dollars to retain an entire work force that may not be bilingual. However, it still does not address the severe issues of the incredible gap of cultural moors and societal norms that are fueling the tensions in the eu…

    • avatar
      Bobi Dochev

      How long? in 20 years? Their second generation born and educated here?!
      And what kind of basic economics we are talking about when EU intend to boos the economy by technological development.

    • avatar
      Jean-Pierre Rosa

      Bobi Dochev i posted various links elsewhere in this thread or, i dunno, do some research.

  5. avatar
    Bastian

    Statistically GDP might get a push but with long lasting negative effects, because for the time being “refugees” and asylum seekers first of all increase the debt burdens of many EU governments which are already highly indebted.

    If EU economies need any inward migration then only very selectively chosen properly qualified individuals.

    • avatar
      Paul X

      We need Immigrants to fund pensions…blah, blah, immigrants doing jobs the locals don’t want blah, blah…. all the usual leftist rubbish.

      The real truth is we don’t just need any old immigrants, we need qualified people who can get jobs with wages above the tax threshold, someone comes to the UK and earns < £11000 they pay nothing to the state or towards my pension

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Hi Paul, what makes you reach this conclusion? Have you got any research into this we can read or you heard it from your God Farage?

    • avatar
      Paul X

      Not much research needed Yasmine, just some freely available basic facts (which the liberal left conveniently choose to ignore)
      Those who claim the UK must have immigration to fund the needs of an aging population are not being factual.
      Immigrants who do not earn above the tax and national Insurance thresholds contribute nothing to the State Pension or NHS

      https://www.gov.uk/national-insurance
      https://www.gov.uk/income-tax-rates

      So as I correctly stated, we don’t need open door immigration but immigrants with a certain educational or skill level that are certain to be employed in a contributory position

    • avatar
      EU reform- proactive

      Aren’t the too “generous” (wrong) assumptions over decades by actuaries & politicians (promises) the real reason that makes most of the government run pension systems accumulating shortfalls, year after years?

      As the deficit (imbalance) of the state run pension schemes keeps growing, they conveniently blame the “other side” of the equation. Like- one needs more contributors (immigrants) & aging- (an “Act of God” & evolution) Only government employees, politicians & bankers pension remain high & guaranteed. The rest is uncertain and a burden to future generations.

      Basically, everyone who aims for a safe retirement should realize & understand it is simply a function of one’s own life choices (self or employer co-funded private retirement products) to secure enough funds within ones 40-45 years working life to retire commensurate to such an effort.

      It is grossly unrealistic & unfair to ask your children to fund their parent’s pension!

    • avatar
      Paul X

      Is it not also grossly unfair to tell those who have contributed all their working life into a state system in the belief that it will be there when they need it, that they are to get nothing?

      Taking out a private pension is up to the individual and those with a “spend today to hell with tomorrow” attitude deserve no sympathy if they find retirement a struggle. If you remove the universal state pension all that will happen is it will be replaced by some means tested “pensioner benefit” so those who were too stupid to provision for their retirement will still get a free hand out paid for off the backs of the rest of society

    • avatar
      EU reform- proactive

      Paul, are government, EU (EMP) & the banker’s state pensions equal or unequal in comparison to the ordinary men in the street? By how much & when will somebody introduce rebalancing & serious reforms for ALL? Politicians who are tasked to oversee our “equality”- are the greatest transgressors- feathering their nests only. They do not consider themselves equal anymore- not before the law (they make them to suit) or any higher “moral or ethical Authority”.

      A compulsory state run pension scheme is ok since it will have the greatest number of contributors, but to be successful it has to be fair, correctly calculated and treat everyone EQUAL- by contributions & eventual benefits. No exceptions! But it doesn’t! You can search & look wherever you wish- e.g.:

      http://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/551187/British-Taxpayers-4billion-Bill-Pensions-EU-Officials

    • avatar
      Paul X

      I’m not disputing the obscenity of the pensions given to EU officials for basically doing very little.
      My reply was only regarding your comment about children funding their parents pensions. I have paid Tax and National Insurance all my working life some of which no doubt has gone towards supporting the pensions of the previous generation, and for you to suggest the rules should now be changed so when I retire I get nothing is to use your own words, “grossly unfair”
      I quite often see something on facebook along the lines of “a pension is earned it is not a benefit” and that is quite true, it is not a state hand out it is something (most) people have contributed to and have a right to expect, the fact that incompetent governments have failed to provide adequate provision is not the fault of the people who have a right to a pension

    • avatar
      EU reform- proactive

      All Right Paul, to use the phrase “children”, “next generations” or “kicking the can down the road” is to demonstrate the imbalances in our compulsory “state pension” systems. People got too reliant on it. It’s in need of urgent reform.

      Guess, the “defined benefit pension schemes” go back to the 1960’s- the baby boomers time. That situation changed- the system hardly. A hot potato!

      People are advised to consider private pension “boosters”- indicating that a compulsory pension (that might differ around Europe) alone will not be sufficient in future. You probably still receive your full promised pension- the question is: will today’s workers? How high, guaranteed or not, inflation linked or not- etc?

      Every contributor should more or less receive what was paid in by the employer and employee plus any growth of the investment over time (as a total). Some “pots” are however empty and capital cannot produce any growth. Assuming that over & under recoveries in benefits balance out. Longevity, the low birth rate (= the risk to live too long) & inequalities bedevil the system. “Earlier” compulsory retirement (55-60) will not fix that (= more benefits leaving the system = less contributions, it will make things worse.

      That’s why we have (honest) & competent Actuaries who can “professionally guess” more accurately and should offer options to all for consideration.
      Happy & prosperous retirement Paul!

      http://www.pensionsadvisoryservice.org.uk/about-pensions/pensions-basics/different-uk-pension-schemes

    • avatar
      Paul X

      @EU reform- proactive

      Thank you for your best wishes though unfortunately retirement is still a few years away yet :-)

      ftr, I have a military pension, I’m contributing to a private sector pension but I still (rightly in my view) expect to get something from the government for all the tax & NI they have screwed out of me over the years…….though their current policy seems to be to keep extending the retirement age, no doubt until it is beyond the life expectancy of 90% or the population

  6. avatar
    Emil Pavlovich

    The question is wrong.How something might be boosted by the refugees? Don’t put aside the focus of the problem.Europe doesn’t need any more immigrants from Third world countries.

  7. avatar
    Paul X

    Refugees will only be of benefit to an economy if they are in a job in which they earn enough to pay tax, which I suggest does not apply in 99% of the cases

    …and as for a “better framework be put in place to recognise qualifications from education institutes in refugees’ home countries”……considering most of the refugees ditch their passports so they cannot be traced they are hardly going to jump out of their overcrowded rubber dingy onto the beaches of Europe clutching a bunch of educational certificates are they?

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      What about the shopping that they do, the rent they pay and the recreation they pay for? Doesn’t that contribute to the economy?

    • avatar
      Paul X

      Possibly Yasmine but that is of more direct benefit to the big supermarket chains and money grabbing landlords, I very much doubt the retail spending of low paid immigrants actually contributes much to the economy of the country

    • avatar
      EU reform- proactive

      Hi Yasmine- you list some instances where refugees might be “spending” money. The point is however WHO ‘S money are they “spending”? If it is their own savings brought from their home country- yes! Than they are comparable to tourists and a “boost”.

      If refugees spend taxpayers money given to them by our governments (cost of training, housing & pocket money)- than that is a social & unproductive expenditure to the state- indebting all taxpayers even further. That requires borrowings from banks & increasing our debt to GDP ratio.

      That is a “drain”- not a “boost”! Government could just as well give every citizen a yearly birthday present of a monthly salary! Hardly anyone would refuse but love that.

  8. avatar
    Stefania Portici

    se ci sta alta disoccupazione come può l’immigrato risolvere il problema del lavoro? I rifugiati e i richiedenti asilo sono un conto ma l’immigrazione di massa è un’altra cosa , è stata provocata e voluta dai neoliberisti per creare un mercato del lavoro che abbassa i diritti di tutti i lavoratori . Sono utili al sistema neoliberista

    if there is high unemployment, how can immigrants solve the problem of work? Refugees and asylum seekers have an account but mass immigration is another thing, was caused and wanted by the neo-liberals to create a labor market that lowers the rights of all workers. They are useful to the neoliberal system

  9. avatar
    Julia Hadjikyriacou

    Quote1: “helping to offset Europe’s ageing population and shrinking labour force” 1) For this point the retirement age is too high anyway and should be lowered to increase jobs. 2) what shrinking labour force with already high employment? Quote2: “fiscal boost as government spending goes up”. 1) financial jargon for fiscal ideals balancing on computers whilst the majority of real people gain no financial improvement. If the EU wants to boost the economy it needs the majority of people needs to have ‘spending money’ and without enough jobs, low pay, job insecurity, high mortgages, and exported jobs to countries with cheap/exploited labour it is not likely to happen. Unless there is an EU-wide unconditional basic income.

  10. avatar
    Fernando Nabais

    This is like asking if cancer will boost someone’s health. The argument that migrants impact positively on the economy because of higher state spending is an insult to the intelligence. The state could simply spend that money with the poor people already living here that will have the same impact on the economy.

    • avatar
      Jean-Pierre Rosa

      Thankfully we know you are an idiot and most economists worth their salt also think you are an idiot.

    • avatar
      Fernando Nabais

      Jean-Pierre Rosa If you have nothing to say and you are only capable of insulting, there is no need to answer. If it is claimed migrants have a positive impact on economy because the state spends more to accommodate them, then if the state spends the same amount of money in anything else will get the same effect. By only insulting you acknowledge there are no arguments to support your point of view. Try to be more tolerant and have respect for others.

    • avatar
      Ander Anderson

      Fernando Nabais These people are refugees

    • avatar
      Jean-Pierre Rosa

      Fernando Nabais by insulting you i amuse myself at pointing out your xenophobic ignorance and probable PNR affiliation. You are scum and should be treated as such and ridiculed and insulted on a daily basis until hopefully you learn something or kill yourself. I want you to STFU and stop embarrassing Portugal. It’s that simple.

  11. avatar
    barona

    They can barely write their own names, let alone work in the highly competitive EU work environment.

  12. avatar
    Francesco Veronese

    ATTENZIONE! Resistere, Resistere Resistere. Le proveranno tutte. Cercheranno di spaventarci. Ricordatevi che il 4 Dicembre sarà la madre di tutte le battaglie. O loro con i loro immorali privilegi, le loro pensioni d’oro o di diamante, vitalizi e stipendi a go go; oppure noi con la nostra pulita determinazione a VOTARE UN BELLISSIMO NO. Votare con la testa ma anche con il cuore e con la pancia. Chi vota NO costruisce la storia ed insegna ai propri figli che vale la pena battersi per un ideale di pulizia e per la vera DEMOCRAZIA. Milioni e milioni di bellissimi NO è poi il 5 Dicembre scoprire che il mondo sarà più giusto, più bello, più nostro! I giochi sono fatti la loro orrenda SCHIFORMA deve essere rinviata al mittente e dalle urne con la vittoria del NO uscirà un eroico messaggio che sprofondera’ nella vergogna coloro che hanno pensato di turlupinare il popolo! Io VOTERÒ UN BELLISSIMO NO!

    • avatar
      Bert van Santen

      Sure, people with no income, drives economical growth. It only costs money

  13. avatar
    Miro Šarić

    Pff, how,? “workforce? Like there’s not enough unemployment in Europe as it is

  14. avatar
    Kei Nakanishi

    if refugee crisis boosts economy, why not getting “proper” immigrants? already highly skilled immigrants moving to US, Canada, Singapore, Dubai, Australia etc rather than to Europe. Even many European guys are moving there, typically in US such as Wall Street, Hollywood, Silicon Valley and so on. Some friends from European countries actually moved there. And as a common sense, most refugees want to go back to their homelands, stopping conflicts in warzone is the most important thing I believe.

    • avatar
      Jean-Pierre Rosa

      This is about refugees. How about you read the article?

  15. avatar
    Gianfranco Gattini

    sure in the futer it will chane..even worse off course.. the maneger of Mercedes who tried some ” workers” sent to him by Angela Mutti Merkel said ” es klappt doch nicht ” it do NOT works !!! frau merekel tried to destroy the Mercedes reputation of a century for a couple of refugees ah ah ah a pure madness I see ah ah ah

  16. avatar
    Sonia Micallef

    It will surely boost the average European;citizen’s support to far right ideology. I will leave that up to you as to what will happen to the ‘temporary’ boost in economic growth.

  17. avatar
    Tim Morgan

    Considering that estimates have put the employment rate at about 30k refugees v the 1 million plus who came to Europe I fail to see how that will help the economy

    • avatar
      EU reform- proactive

      Moderators, please be seen to do your jobs without bias! Since when are grave personal & direct insults to fellow commentators allowed or condoned?

  18. avatar
    Gordon Webster

    Explain please – how can importing millions of people for whom their is no work in failing economies, who will therefore live a life on Benefits boost any economy? I keep asking, but no one yet has attempted an answer.

    • avatar
      Jean-Pierre Rosa

      I posted several links. Can’t you even research within a thread?

    • avatar
      Gordon Webster

      Never mind links, I asked for an explanation of the economic benefit of importing millions of benefits seekers.

    • avatar
      Paul X

      @: Jean-Pierre Rosa

      Yes you posted links and a common claim seems to be we need immigrants to make up for falling tax revenue due to an aging population

      For your information an immigrant in the UK in a low skilled job earning less then £11000 pays no tax at all yet still has use of all the facilities and infrastructure my taxes are paying for

      Posting links is easy, finding facts is clearly a little more difficult

  19. avatar
    Joachim P. Pudrel

    No, it won’t boost economy … at least not for our generation … in one hundred years, who knows?

  20. avatar
    Bernhard Müller

    That’s the question. Can a barely educated person who does not speak the language replace a person who is well educated, speaks the local language fluently and has several years of vocational apprenticeship?

  21. avatar
    Bill

    Refugees and migrants are only a problem when they come from Islamic countries. Asians, Indians, and other non European western countries have no problem assimilating.

  22. avatar
    Joseph Schembri

    I don’t think that underpaid immigrants can boost the economy! All they do is compete to lower wages, and yes they will increase the economy of the rich people who employ them!

  23. avatar
    Rácz Tivadar

    Did the german reunification 1990 boosted the west-german economy? NO!
    The invaders flodded the eu just to benefit from its social system, especially Germany, Sweden, Austrian. The most of them would never be able to integrate and live on their own incomes, as 80% are considered to be functional analphabets.

  24. avatar
    Franck Néo Legon

    No, it will boost a few’s profits and vat taxes incomes on the growing money flux, but this money will be taken from the other citizens, so called “middle class” workers, which will so get poorer.

  25. avatar
    Oli Lau

    how could it boost anything? in most countries they won’t be allowed to work and they will be dependant a social welfare.

    • avatar
      Jean-Pierre Rosa

      There are training and language courses available in almost every European nation.

    • avatar
      Oli Lau

      So additional expenses for taxpayers so far.

  26. avatar
    Jeanne Griffin

    No. Here in Italy we have over 40% youth unemployment with the overwhelming.majority being graduates from specialised high schools. Importing thousands of unskilled migrants from the Third World will only swell.the unemoyment ranks and create a dangerous underclass. Furthermore the presence of migrants only encourages unscrupulous employers to exploit them for cheap labour without the need to pay the workers a decent wage or establishing safety standards at the workplace. As these migrants will be working under the table they obviously won’t pay taxes.

  27. avatar
    Aedin Harris

    The problems of integration lie with the host countries. A lot of these immigrants are very well educated anf could contribute enormously if given the chance.

  28. avatar
    Carlos Gama

    The main economic advantage with what is happening in Germany is the public spending. Due to the refugees crisis a lot of money is being invested with schools, housing, security, etc. what is a very good thing, a lot of jobs have been created with these policy.
    A point that has been forgotten in this discussion is that eventually the country will be stable and the refugees (or most part of them) will want to return to there country. Here is where a good actual investment in the refugees and welcoming them in the society plays a big role. When they go back they will have knowledge and habits they did not had before. This means that they will use the contacts and experience acquired in the country that welcome them and use it. In a Medium- Long-term approach this will created the base for commercial partnerships and development.
    I already notice this in the last years.
    Currently the universities and others welcomed a lot of non-European students that when they return became entrepreneurs or political figures, then they contact the universities and companies with whom they worked and learn to help them develop a certain area or project.
    That is why the refugees create a big opportunity.
    But above all, it is our duty to assist persons that run from wars! Wars are the main reason that refugees exist, if we can not solve the war we can help the citizens.
    Stop being selfish and start being human!

  29. avatar
    EU reform- proactive

    “The 1951 CONVENTION relating to the Status of Refugees is the key legal document in defining who is a refugee, their rights and the legal obligations of governments.”

    Some facts & figures: refugee numbers to Europe surge to 1.3 mio in 2015:

    https://www.mercycorps.org/articles/iraq-jordan-lebanon-syria-turkey/quick-facts-what-you-need-know-about-syria-crisis

    http://www.unhcr.org/figures-at-a-glance.html

    How is this “positive contribution” or input from the stream of refugees to our economy measured? Normally it takes years after schooling & training for any local person to become a responsible, productive & valuable asset to the economy.

    Generally, today’s caliber of asylum seekers in Europe (60% are a mixed bunch of economic fortune seekers- called economic migrants) will remain a burden to any stable society. The lower the skill the cheaper, the quicker is the return to the “formal” & regulated economy. Most will however disappear in the cracks of the illegal shadow economy. Unmeasured!

    “Fiscal boost”, “ageing population” & a “shrinking labour force” are buzzwords. Who is kidding whom? Is it the magic art of the establishment & banks to create (another) financial & social crises?

    Remember the subprime crises in 2007, when central banks “welcomed” greed & flooded the markets with capital. This high risk debt was eventually repackaged by investment bankers as first grade investment products and sold globally to unsuspecting investors? The consequences are history.

    http://www.investopedia.com/articles/07/subprime-blame.asp

    Spot any similarities of another “welcoming”? Repackaging the cost to “integrate temporary refugees” & market them as productive economic assets- to all taxpayers? Borrow from banks to increase the debt to GDP ratio- called “boost”?

    The extra costs to its annual budget varies & depends on a country’s generosity of how to “handle, pamper & teach” the mainly unknown, undocumented & unskilled refugees by state paid “volunteers”. Results pure speculation!

    Too many complicated issues and we are expected to applaud- whom?

  30. avatar
    r

    50 millions of unproductive islamic leechers in Europe and 80% on welfare jihad complaining that free houses, etc etc etc PAID BY THE EUROPEAN TAXPAYER are not suitable for an honorable lifestyle despite getting 200% more than the natives

  31. avatar
    Yasmine

    I don;t think they have so far. Perhaps people selling tents and life jackets have benefited the most. Hopefully, they will pay the respective tax.

  32. avatar
    EU reform- proactive

    @DE & Moderators

    A yet ignored objection was registered on the 29th (see above- by myself) about Jean-Pierre Rosa (obviously) transgressing your strict code of conduct.

    Please explain if words like “You = Idiot” has been officially sanctioned & entered into the latest DE pc dictionary?

    PS: For interest’s sake- what is rated more abusive? The usage of “nerd” (“an intelligent but single-minded person obsessed with a nonsocial hobby or pursuit- like a computer nerd”) or “idiot”? What lingo would be acceptable? The word “EU nerd” or “EU idiot” or none? Please, do not remove my innocent query!

    Touching a raw nerve?

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      I agree that moderation of the site is partial and lacks consistency. Technically speaking, from a linguistics perspective, there are no abusive words. Actually meanings assigned to words are arbitrary and words change their meanings through time. The words idiot comes from Greek and literally means “private owner”. One of the philosophers, Socrates, if I am not mistaken, believed that owning private property made the person irrational, as he would concentrate on defending and multiplying the property to the point that the he lost his common sense. However, in Greek, idiotis still means a private owner and there is no negative connotation attached to the word nowadays. In English and other languages, idiot continues to mean stupid…

  33. avatar
    Andrew Potts

    Providing shelter, schooling, health, welfare and many other things in the short term will increase public spending but usually public spending is borrowed money which the children and grand children have to pay. You can borrow money and spend it on anything for a short term gain. You do have to raise the question of the morality of stealing the young and healthy from one country to boost the economy of another country.

    • avatar
      Uli Czeranka

      this kind of public spending is on noones back. first as stated it supports the economy directly and it is compared to the banking crisis in no way relevant.

  34. avatar
    Vytautas Vėžys

    Yep, and suddenly all those engineers, teachers and businessmen run away from Lithuania cause we don’t give them enough welfare to support family without working…

  35. avatar
    Christos Mouzeviris

    Nope.. To do so, we will need to re-industrialize Europe, thus bring back factories that left for developing countries. What good will a refugee be in Europe, if we don’t have or don’t give them jobs to do.

  36. avatar
    Любомир Иванчев

    No. The short-term benefits of a cheaper labor force won’t outweigh the costs for food, shelter and integration into society of millions of migrants. These costs are billions of euros. Also, not to mention a large number of these migrants have absolutely no professional skills which are needed at the labor market.

  37. avatar
    カメニャク マリオ

    Refuges will take some jobs that we honestly don’t want to do. And by mixing with the home population they will even fix the problem of our aging population a bit. However for that to happen we must integrate them and mix them into our population.

    • avatar
      EU reform- proactive

      @ Mario Kamenyaku- as simple as that? Like “mixing” traditional Japanese + “Chinese” = far east bliss?

      ……………”must mix & integrate”? Like shuffling a pack of cards- the pc “Brussels Mix”? Did the fact ever dawn on you that sizeable groups of Muslim or M- refugees will NEVER mix? Like oil & water, Muslim Faithfull’s and Infidels. They choose to segregate to form enclaves of their kinsfolk- sharing traditions, religion & culture wherever they are. Still an unknown in the EU?

      * ………….”fixing the aging population”? Any refugee who sought & applied is (must be) given (temporary) shelter, safety & offered (temporary) work- if capable & willing. Once their country is safe, refugees are meant to return and contribute in reconstruction of their own society- not the EU 27. Permanently fixing what?

    • avatar
      Paul X

      The “Jobs people don’t want to do ” is a liberal lefty myth, in reality it is “Jobs that do not pay enough to support local people with homes and families because a single person with no responsibilities and who is prepared to live in a caravan with 7 others will happily accept a much lower salary”
      I agree the second definition is not as “snappy” but it is certainly more factual

  38. avatar
    Andrew Potts

    All public spending comes from taxes on people or business somebody now or in the future has to pay the tax to cover the spending that is the reality. Believing that this spending is for nothing is just not true it only means is your government has hidden it.

  39. avatar
    Robert Santa

    In global terms yes, but in relative terms immigration is a net cost to Europe, as it lacks the selectivity – and the attractivity to high-skilled migrants – that you see in Australia or Canada.

  40. avatar
    Christina Kler

    No !!! It will only make it worse …. we will all suffer including these poor people that are running away from their land that OUR politics destroyed ….

  41. avatar
    Hector Niehues-Jeuffroy

    No, it won’t. It will lead to a short-term increase in public spending, which could have been achieved by simply redistributing more resources to the continent’s disadvantaged. In the medium and long term, the integration of refugees, most of whom haven’t completed high school or vocational education, don’t speak the language of the country they came to (mostly Germany), and often possess a set of values strongly different from that of the native population (e.g. when it comes to gender equality and freedom of expression), will be a strong drain on Europe’s resources. The negligence with which European border security and the crises in Syria and Iraq are and were handled by European politicians (looking at you, Merkel) has good chances to become the biggest European political failure of the 2010s.

  42. avatar
    Stella Kontogianni

    It will boost Europe’s economy if we deal with it in the right aspect. Now two out of 27 EU members are sharing the vast majority of them and they are up to surrender if not collapse. Refugee crisis is a result of wars in Middle East and Africa. First we have to do something with the cause of refugee crisis.

    • avatar
      Alfredo Freskito

      How about stopping the dehumanization of Europe? Or stop making the middle classes pay for the crisis and start putting pressure on corporations, monopolies and big capital abuses? How about that?

    • avatar
      Alfredo Freskito

      But don’t worry mate, they history is directed again in the direction you want and we will probably have to regret it later.

    • avatar
      GonEprata Megarp

      I dont agree with you alfredo, if a, break is not put on islam, then then will be nothin to regret! The regret you are talking about is ridiculous and its thea cause they are subjecting themselfs to this ridiculous refugee that us not at all about refugee crisis, but that is not ridiculous to you because you fell guilty? So then why not goo to those places, why bring pakistan, turkey, somalia and most third world countries to europe at the rate of thousands a day? Because europeans are aging? Because greedy capitalists want cheap labour? If thats the reason you think its worth ending europe its ok, i just dont consider you to be truly european! I agree with you about the coorporations but as i said, and if you are.really worried about the “dehumanzation” of europe know that deliberate economical crisis crushes the morality of europe and deliberate demogrsphic crisis crushes its identity.

  43. avatar
    Enric Mestres Girbal

    What they do is to destroy our society. If you want refugees, open the doors to the CHRISTIANS…they do suffer in their islamic countries

  44. avatar
    John Marcogliese

    It depends on what totals are shown. Not all expenses may be deducted. A few businesses will be headlined without showing the total expenses.

  45. avatar
    Maria Rodrigues

    European incapacity to face and help refugees is not good and shows that Europe is kind of a fake.

  46. avatar
    Nando Aidos

    What kind of question is this? Let us not confuse the issues!
    Let us not cover things up and pretend.
    This question almost sounds as if a war that causes refugees is good for the economy, which begs the question – is someone advocating we have more wars?
    Or, is someone implying that the EU should help the refugees because they are good for the economy, not because the EU has a moral obligation to help these people?
    The economy and the refugees are two separate issues!

  47. avatar
    nando

    What kind of question is this? Let us not confuse the issues!
    The economy and the refugees are two separate issues!
    Let us not confuse things and pretend it is all OK.

    This question almost sounds as if a war that causes refugees is good for the economy, which begs the question – is someone advocating we have more wars?
    Or, is someone implying that the EU should help the refugees because they are good for the economy, not because the EU has a moral obligation to help these people?

  48. avatar
    Dino Boy Mican

    Well, supposedly yes, in the long run. For the time being they re burdening us with lots of costs

    • avatar
      Erwin Dale Brown

      Yeah, we can generalize. We have over 12 million illegals here and thousands of companies who are allowed by the government to go to the bank to get billions in cash dollars so they can pay people under the table and then avoid all that paperwork for collecting and paying taxes and social security. It’s like we the people of America do not have the right to ask corporations to follow the same rules we are required to follow. You couldn’t stop people from generalizing through this even if there were a law against it.

    • avatar
      EU reform- proactive

      Paul sorry, you are one of many who are confusing immigrants and refugees! Please read the forum question carefully- thereafter think- then answer.

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