languages

How do you say ‘Diversity’ in Maltese? The European Union has 24 official languages (including Maltese). In theory, all 24 of them are accepted as working languages within the European institutions. In practice, however, only two of them – English and French – are widely used, and of these English is by far the most common.

Now that the UK is committed to pulling out of the EU, could it be time to give French a boost as the Lingua Franca of Europe? Since the Brexit vote, a slew of international papers (see here, here, here, and here, for example) have been reporting on the possibility of English losing its status as an official EU language. It doesn’t seem to make economic sense (English is by far the most widely-spoken language in Europe, and is the international language of business), but, then, politics doesn’t always add up rationally.

We had a comment from Toni, for example, who argued that it was a question of passion and principles: “The Britons said ‘No’ to the EU. Why should the EU say ‘Yes’ to English as a working language of the EU?”

To get a reaction, we spoke to Danuta Hübner, a Polish MEP for the centre-right European People’s Party (EPP), and Chair of the European Parliament’s Committee on Constitutional Affairs. What would she say to Toni?

hubnerI would say: Dear Toni, you should also remember that we have Ireland and Malta among our Member States. In both countries, English is an official language. So, in any case, those countries would have the right to have the English language in the EU.

The second thing to remember is: I think we all see that English is the most popular language in the EU, particularly among EU citizens travelling to other countries. If we held a competition for a language to call Europe’s Lingua Franca, English would probably win.

Over the decades, English has become the international language. We have also, throughout the history of European integration, developed everything that we have produced in English, in terms of laws, in terms of all sorts of initiatives that have the format of written documents. So, I see no reason to stop using this language.

By the way, “Diversity” in Maltese is apparently “Diversità”. At least, that’s what Google Translate tells us (I’m sure our Maltese readers will be ready to correct us!).

Why should the EU keep English as an official working language? The UK said “No” to the EU, so should the EU say “No” to English? Let us know your thoughts and comments in the form below, and we’ll take them to policymakers and experts for their reactions!

IMAGE CREDITS: CC / Flickr – Eric Andresen



569 comments Post a commentcomment

What do YOU think?

    • avatar
      Peter

      In your EU hater dreams. But don’t bother nasty reality. Sleep well and relax!

    • avatar
      Nick Gilbert

      EU survive Brexit??? Oh fuck right off! Britain needs the EU FAR MORE than the EU needs Britain!!!!!!!!

    • avatar
      Red

      You are making the false assumpton that the UK will actually leave the EU

    • avatar
      Shane

      Nick, the survival of the EU being questioned is not based on the EU *needing* the UK, but rather on the precedent the UK has set that other countries may wish to follow…

    • avatar
      Nuno M

      …like you are making the assumption the UK will actually survive outside the EU.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Stop the nastiness. Britain will leave the EU because if May doesn’t do it UKIP will win the next election. The EU might survive Brexit, but that depends on if the EU actually re-evaluates how it currently does things. If not other countries will leave one by one until it’s an untenable situation and will then implode. Brexit is a symptom, not the illness. And as for who needs who more, I’d argue that Britain doesn’t need the EU at all. We have always cooperated with Europe to lesser or greater extents with or without that organisation, I see no reason us leaving that organisation needs to mean we leave Europe to it’s fate. After all, it’s a US presidential candidate that wants to abandon it’s nato allies, not Britain. But one thing that will without a doubt create an irreparable rift between the UK and the EU it’s all this pointless and counter productive pettiness.

    • avatar
      Peter

      Duncan (and others), Brexit is not a symptom of the EU needing to work differently. It is a sympton of short-term looking politicians blaming the EU for all that goes bad, and praising the UK for all things good. Same story in other countries where nationalistic parties are on the rise…
      And for those who have been napping: after each crisis EU comes out stronger (e.g. the banking crisis where now better checks and balances are in places than before).

  1. avatar
    Nando Aidos

    This is a non-preoccupation!
    Who cares?
    Businesses, but they have their solutions based on practicalities.
    Tourists, and they have their solutions based on practicalities.
    Brussels, they can create their solution based on practicalities.
    Why then do we need to impose those practicalities on the rest of the 500 million Europeans who are not businesses, or tourists, or EU government officials?
    Give me one reason. One!

    • avatar
      Jonathan

      Because normal EU citizens are not plants. They mooove! If I want to go and enjoy the sun in Italy (as in go and live there) it is highly impractical to have to learn another language that is spoken nowhere outside of that one country. The obvious exceptions to this would be France and Spain.

    • avatar
      Diego

      You wrote it in Italian, though.

  2. avatar
    Christos Mouzeviris

    Yes…. Most Europeans speak it as second language…. It is the de facto language of Europe and it will stay as such…. Unless the Chinese take over the world….!! Haha

    • avatar
      Elisabeth Slavkoff

      They will. But they speak English as a second language…Nowadays you cannot graduate from a Chinese University without passing an English test.

    • avatar
      Nick

      And we all know that they can’t speak English properly over there anyway.

  3. avatar
    Peter

    Why not shift to Letzebuergesch as EU language? They are in charge of EU finances, court and commission anyway.

    English will be declining in importance with possible EU exit of the UK, and, especially, if there will be a Trump presidency.

    The simplest and cheapest way would of course be to stick to English.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Peter
      I hope that either German or French wins the post-Brexit EU language war.

      If German wins, then the EU will adopt the language of its master biggest net contributor.

      If French wins then the EU will reflect the language appropriate & reflective of a Banana Federation!.

      I am not personally too bothered myself, the EU was a declining bloc before Brexit and will decline faster post-Brexit.

      So long as full passport control is introduced alongside WTO tariffs re UK-EU trade I will be content.

    • avatar
      Peter

      @Tarquin Farquhar
      That’s very gentle of you. Personally, I am a bit bothered about Britains well-being, but I can assure you there is no reason to be concerned about the development of the EU. It will find fitting solutions as it always has.

      In your scenario a would prefer French as most Germans and Austrians have a very positive view of French culture, many EU citizens are Romance speakers and I like the Federation idea. In compensation for French language, EU could shift more to German/Austrian/Swiss style parliamentarism and rule-of-law traditions to avoid any bananaism.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Peter
      Switzerland is the best example of a Federation that works in Europe. BTW it is a majority German speaking country and therein lies the rub.

      Methinks Romance languages are counter-democratic – do some research on Germanic languages and Romance languages drilled down by corruption and rule of law.

      I think Romance languages are a key factor in societal corruption and societal disruption?

    • avatar
      David

      Well are you saying English has no ties to corruption? Some people are very subjective when it comes to the UK.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @David, I doubt that the language spoken has anything to do with how corrupt somebody is. No matter what any statistics may show.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @David.
      No.
      I agree.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      Don’t shoot the (data-) messenger!

  4. avatar
    Tiago Miranda

    Supposedly yes. The Internet, Financial and Scientific community as made English the de facto international language, and it would be absurd to drop it because of Brexit in the EU. Most of us had English as second language at school, and it is one od the two official languages of the Republic of Ireland.

  5. avatar
    Enzo

    It is difficult that English language can be replaced by another language. All countries in Europa have classes of English for long time and many people use it in their job. Not easy to learn a new language!

  6. avatar
    Maral Hajenian

    Europe.. now you are going too far with your absurdity !!! ENGLISH is the official language WORLDWIDE !!

  7. avatar
    Maral Hajenian

    Europe.. now you are going too far with your absurdity !!! ENGLISH is the official language WORLDWIDE !!

    • avatar
      Duncan

      What an absurd notion. You claim brexiteers are exclusionist and then suggest dropping the most used language world wide from EU dealings. Fine, go speak German or French. Go ahead and isolate yourselves from the UK, USA, Ireland, Malta, India, China, Japan, etc. etc. etc. Make it so if NATO ever has to mobilise in defence of the EU there’s no commonality in language to simplify communications. . . . . . . . .

    • avatar
      Peter

      @Duncan

      What an imperialist notion. That’s probably exactly the attitude, why Scottish and Irish people distance themselves from Westminster. Ireland and Malta are highly respected EU members (as an independent Scotland would be, too) and as the vast majority of NATO is. Malta will e.g. hold the next EU presidency in 2017 and set its agenda concerning EU immigration.

      What a weird idea of a confrontation between EU and NATO! Just let a Trump presidency exit NATO (scenario, not likely) and NATO would become an EU institution similar to future ESA.

      BTW, exiting English is just a scenario. Nobody would seriously consider that at the moment.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Peter you seem to have seriously missread my post. I never suggested a NATO vs EU situation, I suggested NATO needing to defend Europe. I fail to see anything imperialist about my comment. I merely pointed out the absurdity in suggesting dropping the closest thing the world has to a common language from the EU.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Weronika Natkaniec
      Judging by your post your suggestion its is obvious that “English” was never a strong point of yours.

    • avatar
      Αγγελος

      EsperaNTo, φίλε!

    • avatar
      Αγγελος

      It is spelt Esperanto. And yes, it would be a good idea.

    • avatar
      Ανδρέας

      Δημήτρη, Theoretically Esperanto would be a good idea but these times we have to think in economic terms. English is the most widely spoken language in the EU and is understood by 51% of all adults. It would not be financially sustainable if about 200 million people had to learn a new language which, additionally, today is not used at all (no literature, no scientific terms etc). Besides English remains the official language of two member states (Ireland and Malta).

  8. avatar
    Paul X

    There is no logical reason to change from English which is also the universally accepted language in the world of business. To suggest it changes to French has no logic, would cost millions of Euros and would purely be done to pander to that countries sense of self importance (just like the extremely costly EU parliament swapping between Brussels and Strasbourg)…but what the hell… what’s more important, taxpayers money or Gallic pride?

    • avatar
      Αγγελος

      Please note that English is not THE official language of the EU — it is ONE of its 24 official languages. It is indeed, and has been since the mid-nineties, the language most frequently used in its institutional activities, but this could change (not overnight, but gradually) if the UK truly left.

    • avatar
      Paul X

      I have not used the word official, only “universally accepted”.

      I guarantee 100% even if the EU decides to change its language priorities, the world of business will continue to use English so any change by the EU will basically be them making life difficult for themselves just to appease certain countries egos

      (maybe refer this topic to Yasmine on what “inward looking” means…lol)

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Paul, I can understand that you desperately need to involve me, as you failed to come up with a meaningful and convincing argument the last time (convincing to a genuinely international, non-UKIP/introvert-island-mentality person)…However, I am sorry, but I am not interested.

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Hi Paul, here is the official definition of inward-looking:

      “inward-looking, adjective,adjective: inward-looking
      not interested in or taking account of other people or groups.”, google

      “inward-looking
      (ˈɪnwədˌlʊkɪŋ)
      Definitions
      Collins English Dictionary
      adjective
      (of a people or society) more interested in themselves than in other people or societies ⇒ an insular and inward-looking community”

      Macmillan:

      “inward-looking – definition and synonyms
      Using the thesaurus
      Thesaurus
      Thesaurus diagram
      adjective inward-looking pronunciation in British English
      Contribute to our Open Dictionary
      not interested in other people or things that do not affect you
      Synonyms and related words
      Selfish, greedy and not generous:selfish, greedy, cynical… ”

      The freedictionary.com:
      “inward-looking
      inward-looking
      adj
      (of a people or society) more interested in themselves than in other people or societies”

      Doesn’t it describe perfectly well the British attitude towards the EU and its peoples? Trade is not really part of the definition but it is a necessity nowadays, isn’t it? You have to do it, unless you want to starve like North Korea and Cuba…

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Paul, please, don’t bother to get back with some long-winded post that only makes sense to you trying to avoid admitting how sad this attitude looks from the outside and yet feels normal to the people practicing it…, unless you are determined to make me laugh even harder than the last time!

    • avatar
      Paul X

      Wow Yasmine, three replies….you must really go to town when you are “interested” ;-)

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Paul, I am not interested in your conversation with Angelos, which you have tried to drag me into. As indeed I am not interested in any more of your own interpretations of “inward-looking”. Trust the clarification helps.

  9. avatar
    Elie Awad

    My info that the EU has more than 23 official languages and every document and debate is translated to all languages .can u comfirm Breuer Carlo ?

  10. avatar
    Elie Awad

    My info that the EU has more than 23 official languages and every document and debate is translated to all languages .can u comfirm Breuer Carlo ?

    • avatar
      Spaniardfbm

      Working papers and most of documents are translated only to English, French and German. And it would be funny to have the stats of which version is readed more often.

  11. avatar
    leleu

    Nur Esperanto estas malstulta propono.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Leleu
      ‘Desperanto’? I prefer Klingon!

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu

      @Tarquin, ok, then learn Klingon, but also start learning differences at least between Klingon and Esperanto:
      artlang (=klingon), auxlang (Esperanto). Purpose: movie/art (klingon), international language (Esperanto). Works fine as: alien-like language (klingon), easy/fairer bridge language for humanity (Esperanto).

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu
      Maybe, I’ll use Google translate! ;)

  12. avatar
    George

    De facto yes, because it’s practical. However every EU pupil should learn intensively (5 hours a week) from fourth grade to 12th another European language. We should all be bilingual. All political leaders, nation level and EU level, should be fluent in two European languages by law.

  13. avatar
    Paul X

    Esperanto ekzistas jam 130 jarojn kaj ricevis absolute nenie

  14. avatar
    Andrea

    In the 18th and 19th century France greatly contributed to the cultural progress of the whole mankind, but from the Dreyfus affair on… well, I wouldn’t be that proud of chauvinism, of politicians deserting international meetings, scientists claiming that water has a memory, philosophers selling hot air, bureaucrats wasting my money to move the EU Parliament to and from Strasbourg every month etc.
    English, on the contrary, allows everyone to access directly the best products of the human intellect being produced every day everywhere in the world and to talk directly with a majority of the inhabitants of the world and above all of the nation that in the past one hundred years has contributed the most to the material and political progress of the western civilization, if not of the whole mankind.
    Are you still wondering what may my opinion be?

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Andrea
      French is dying – vive Anglaise!

  15. avatar
    nando

    Who cares?
    Businesses, but they have their solutions based on practicalities.
    Tourists, and they find their solutions based on practicalities.
    Brussels, they can create their solution based on practicalities.
    Why then do we need to impose those practicalities on the rest of the 500 million Europeans who are not businesses, or tourists, or EU government officials?
    Give me one good reason. One!

    Is this what the EU worries about?

  16. avatar
    Peter Castermans

    Why not, most people in Ireland speak English and Ireland is an EU-country (with some luck, Scotland too). And English is still an universal language which isn’t that hard to learn in comparison to other languages.

  17. avatar
    leleu

    @ Nando// Demokratio estas la racio

  18. avatar
    NZt Limitless

    We can speak the best of all languages,witch is :the signs language.so no one will ofense.=))

  19. avatar
    Ciprian Scutca

    English is the most spread language in Europe…so it is at list stupid to throw it away…as the previous comment mentioned..see Ireland’s case.

  20. avatar
    Andrea

    And talking about “diversità”, it seems that the Maltese borrowed it literally from Italian, as well as Italian has always borrowed and still borrows words from several languages. Instead, by refusing to borrow foreign words for the sake of grandeur, French may well condemn itself to become soon so poor a language that less and less people find it of any use.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Andrea
      Well said!

  21. avatar
    Wendy Everett

    No reason for Europe to keep English as official language if England insists on moving backwards in time and space.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      -_- when will people realise we are moving forward not backwards? The EU as an entity was/is defunct leaving before it gets worse was a progressive decision not regressive. As stated elsewhere on the thread, the reasons for keeping English are numerous, such as Ireland, Malta, trade with the rest of the world (which will still include the UK) and ease of communications between NATO alliance members. So far as I can tell there are only 2 reasons to drop the language. 1) to prompt your own language internationally to improve it’s standing world wide (so a selfish, nationalist reason) and 2) out of spite towards England because you think it will somehow have a negative impact on us. . . . Just counting pros vs cons keeping it would win, that’s before you actually look at the validity of each pro and con.

  22. avatar
    Rosemary Morgan

    You won’t be rid of our beautiful language even if the UK does break free. Tell me where French would get you in today’s world. But hey dream on …..

  23. avatar
    catherine benning

    As I speak all three, English, French and some German, it doesn’t matter to me. Also, I understand and can ‘light speak’ Italian. It makes life a lot easier. And I love all of them.

    Although French and Italian are the prettiest.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Well nearly all French and German language skills I developed have been dropped through lack of use. I would agree that French is more feminine to speak and German more masculine and gruff. But IF you look at it logically, the best alternatives to English language internationally would be Spanish, or Mandarin, or Arabic. French and German would be very low on the list. So IF the EU was to make the mistake of dropping English then I’d really suggest Spanish would be a better choice. At least then most of south America and some in the USA would be able to talk to you.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      Yes, Spanish trumps dying French.

      Although the gravitas associated with Spanish is more based on fecundity rather than [as is the case with English] facundity!

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin I don’t think it’s a debate about why languages are successful. The question is should English remain as the dominant (by which I mean chiefly used only) language of the EU. My point is that English is the dominant language across the world so, yes. But IF that idea is unbearable for Europeans after Brexit, then Spanish or Arabic would be better options than French or German (based on the assumption that the EU doesn’t want to shut itself off from the rest of the world).

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      You made a good and relevant 1st point but your post was soured by your idea that Arabic (a non-European language) would be a better option post-Brexit.

      Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo!

    • avatar
      Duncan

      I don’t think I soured anything. I bet you can find plenty of native speakers of Arabic dwelling within the EU. And I also know that Arabic has a fairly decent global footprint. Besides I just said it would be a better option than French or German. Not that it ought to be the obvious choice.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      You IMHO did sour your post.
      BTW, why do you hate Spanish so much?

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin could you explain how you arrived at your opinion that I soured something by stating the validity of Arabic as an option, since I am really struggling to see your viewpoint. As for hating Spanish, I never said that, what made you think I did?

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      Do you know how many EU languages each have more speakers than Arabic in the EU?

      Do you know how many EU languages each have more speakers than Arabic in the RoW?

      Come back to me when you’ve bothered to do some research rather than vent your spleen.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin answering a question with multiple questions then signing off with a thinly veiled and frankly badly phrased insult is not an answer. So I’ve now made the assumption that you actually dislike Arabic for ‘personal reasons’ and therefore think any suggestion of it’s use as sour or in poor taste. I wasn’t aware the only advantages for international communication were number of speakers. I was also under the impression that coverage of those speakers would matter. Even if there are more people speaking Latvian in the world than Arabic (which there aren’t by the way, but not actually relevant to my point) that would still make Latvian less useful internationally as >99% of Latvian speakers reside within the borders of the EU. Arabic has got people across the world. Almost every country is home to a community of Arabic speakers. So it’s a valid option for international communications where Latvian would not be. Admittedly Spanish, Portugese, French, Dutch and english are all better globally represented than Latvian, but since I’m not the one who’s avoiding explaining myself I don’t really see as I should have to take this seriously anymore.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      It is clear that you do not understand the idiocy/contradictory nature of your last sentence.

      LOL!

      Incidentally, I personally do not like Arabic, in part due to its aggressive, guttural sound.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin, I thought it was clear from my last sentence I did realise the nature of my last sentence, and indeed all of my post.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Frankly this stops being a sensible conversation when people start bringing slightly more eloquent form of “because, you’re stupid!” To the discussion.

  24. avatar
    Danny Boy

    The question of English may soon become immaterial, if the current crazy open door migration policy continues, in less than thirty years we’ll all be speaking Arabic.

  25. avatar
    Leo Raffaele

    The language of Europe should be either German (because it is the most important and spoken language, I like it) or Esperanto (which is a mix of European languages and is very easy to learn, I don’t like it a lot but it’s right for all the Europeans)!

    • avatar
      Spaniardfbm

      French is spoken in Africa and Asia. Spanish, in North and South America.
      Nobody speak German except the germans. It would be a really silly option.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Leo Raffaele
      Esperanto!

      Why not Dalek-speak?

    • avatar
      Andrea

      English itself is a mixture of different languages and by far many more people found it easy enough to learn than Esperanto. So, no reason to switch.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Andrea, any ethnic language is a mix of other languages.

      “By far many more people found it easy enough to learn than Esperanto”. I hope you gave in Esperanto is easier than English (and yes, that difference is a fact, not an opinion, it is measurable). You are basing you argument on the opinion of ignorant people about two options here discussed. It’s like saying when arabic numerals were arriving to Europe: “By far many more people found Roman numerals easy enough to learn than Arabic numeral”.

      The current ignorance of a majority about an easier alternative can’t be a reason not to switch this expensive, unfair and stupid situation. You used an argumentum ad populum, so it isn’t relevant.

    • avatar
      Andrea

      Alex Escomu I don’t find your remarks worth replying.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Andrea, if you don’t find my replies based on the truth worth replying, is up to you. I hope you got at least conscient your reply and main reason not to switch was just based on an availability bias.

      It’s like advertising this way: 100% of woodcutters that only tried knives to cut trees down confirm they are easier than other alternatives (they have never tried!)!
      Buy now your English knife for 1000$ and learn how to use it perfectly (really?) after just 10 years!
      People that were born in Englishknifeland can teach you, they have been using their English knives for cutting food since they were born, you can bet they can teach you how to use them to cut trees down and create solid bridges with other peoples on the world! ;)

    • avatar
      Andrea

      Alex Escomu I don’t find your nonsense worth reading.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      But it seems you see it is worth replying… xD

      you call my replies nonsense or unworthy remarks but you can’t point anything wrong…

      Maybe because of a lack of solid arguments (you just teplied Leo with an obvious fact: English is to some extend a mix of other languages + nonsense “comparison”: more people that just know A think A is good, not trying B, than the number of people who say B is way easier [knowing both A and B]).

      So you are just replying to protect your pride having the last word like a child. Unless you give some real arguments, I’ll ignore your last word you’ll probably say.

      I’ll type some options for you:
      I don’t find your comment worth… replying/reading/type you verb here, click enter and feel proud of supporting your reply to Leo this way ;)

  26. avatar
    Chris

    Politics almost always favors the English language: The French and Germans are not popular around Europe, and neither are their languages. It’s the same in Asia: There aren’t enough Japanese to justify learning that language. The Chinese government and people are roundly disliked by other Asians, so English remains the favored language of Asia. Indeed, when the Chinese and Japanese speak to each other, they use English — thereby, no one loses face. As for Arabic, everybody — except Muslims, of course — hates Islam, so no one wants to learn Arabic because they associate Arabic with Islam.

  27. avatar
    Stewart Kingsley

    The English language that everyone is learning the world over is American English (which is not English at all).

    • avatar
      catherine benning

      Stewart Kingsley

      You are so right. They don’t know how to speak or pronounce English correctly, or indeed spell it. Example: innernet, menal illness, innernasional and so on. They have lost the T. Then there is meorrr, for mirror.

      The spelling is laughable: labor, color, donut, aluminum, along with a series of others. It is cartoon speak. A major case of dumbing down.

      And have you noticed the endless hours of free media air time they are getting for the endless run up to their rigged presidential election. How is it British tax payers are having to foot the bill of the crazed conventions they claim is democracy in that strange and very sick country.

      The idea put forward that a seriously crooked career politician can be in the lead or neck and neck with a man who came out of nowhere is a laugh. In fact it simply spreads the virus of corruption throughout the world. Clinton is despised and her record for all the years in office is the most dismal of all reason to elect such a crook. The competition is being flogged for his lack of political correctness and his refusal to bend to the Goldman Sachs, bent Wall Street crowd who fear his refusal to beat their drum. However, his main platform must be he hasn’t been part of the US and world demise as the liars on the other side.

      He, at very least, has the opportunity to be the saviour of us all. Although he also could be a wolf in sheep clothing. However, she can only ever be more of the same and worse. Her track record proves it.

      Mainly though, I don’t want to be buying tickets via their promotion on my countries media. Or, devote the endless hours to it we have to endure. We do not have a vote so what the hell do we care about their appalling show.

      We hear its because she is a woman. Oh, really, looks and acts more like a man to me.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Catherine. You should care. I’m in no way a Clintonite, but if Trump were to win the presidency then the whole world will be in trouble. As much as I hate the pushy nature of America’s foreign policy, if they dropped it without warning like Trump seems to suggest he will then it’s open season for Russia, China and North Korea to get more pro active on the global front to name but a few.

  28. avatar
    Susanna Green

    Oh please….England isn’t going to be towed further away out into the Atlantic!! What about all the business the E.U does with North America ? If anything Spanish would be a sensible language to learn…

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Susanna Green
      Spanish is better than French but it is unfortunately associated with corruption, disruption, hyper-fecundity and backwardness.

      RE ‘backwardness’ – despite the fact that Spanish is spoken by ‘hectomillions’ its technical, cultural, space, business, engineering, consultancy, transport, science, engineering, computing and innovation footprint is very,very,very small compared to the language ‘footprint’ possessed by English.

      If you check out the ‘Sapir–Whorf hypothesis’ you may begin to understand why Spanish is not a sensible ‘lingua franca’ for the world at large.

    • avatar
      catherine benning

      @ Duncan:

      The danger we have right now is because of American foreign policy. They have brought about the chaotic situation we have in Europe. Or, are you blind and deaf? And who was their Secretary of State?

      You need to worry far more about the world and Europe if Clinton gets in. She is determined to be more of an aggressive man than any male of the species. She is a nut. And her having a finger on the button is perilous. Have you not understood it is her influence that has brought all this about after Bush and Blair began the entire fiasco starting in Iraq followed with Afghanistan?

      Wake up, Russia is being used as the criminal Goldstein. 1984. The fear is the truth coming out of RT.

      https://www.reviewessays.com/Book-Reports/1984/3546.html

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Catherine, I agree with most of your points. However you are forgetting one undeniable truth. If America were to shut down it’s aggressive foreign policy rapidly (like the flick of a light switch) that would in fact cause a power vacuum globally. The European nations that have for the passed 60 years relied heavily on American military strength to subsidise their own defence spending would be left to face the situation unprepared. I’d be all for a US president saying “I have a 10 year plan to slowly reduce our aggressive foreign policy” as this would enable time to build and recruit. However with an ever increasingly tenuous situation with Turkey (NATO’s 2nd biggest military) Trumps “don’t care about you, you aren’t America” stance is a very real danger to Europe. And i don’t mean the EU, or the governments of Europe, or financial stability. I’m talking about the millions of people who live in Europe. It would also suck to live in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and so on and so forth.

  29. avatar
    GonEprata Megarp

    Is this kind of trash questions that are supposed debate europe and change it? Thats why i usually do not follow stuff like this, like with all the freedoms given to england brexit, lol if you think brexit alone will end illigal imigration, and restore england you better look again, that was to create the illusion of nurevolution, do not let these tricky politicians fool you, they want you to debate uselesness forever.

  30. avatar
    Leondios Kratzwald

    German is the biggest native speaker community in Europe, hence, German is the language of choice. Greek would be an option aswell. Spanglish, maybe…

  31. avatar
    Jeffrey ten Velde

    Most nations still speak english so it seems fine to me. But Germany, Italy, Spain and France probably all want there own languauge.

  32. avatar
    Antonio Santos

    Os ingleses estaose barimbando para a U.E..Alias comoa maioria de 52% demonstrou com sensacional Brexit.
    English e a lingua do mundo.Facil de aprender.Directa.Uma lingua do povo.Imbativel.Se hoje nao sabes ingles es analfabeto.
    Recentemente lium anuncio num jornal algarvio (hamuitos):
    Procura se limpador de fossas com bons conhecimentos de ingles.

  33. avatar
    Fran

    EU can definitely survive without the UK, but it will definitely not survive if it intends to shut itself from the rest of the world. English is needed to do business with the US, and let’s not forget Asia. The world did not learn English because of the U.K., we do so because it has become an international working language.

  34. avatar
    Jan Nieuwland

    Despite what memberstates do speak whatever language it is – or should be – a consideration what language is spoken and understood by most europeans as a second language. And my bet is that it is english. Probably it would be most efficient and cost efffective to even skip all other languages and adopt english as the one single language within eu burocracy….. although the french would not let it happen ;)
    Should anyone want to ‘punish’ the uk why not adopt american english instead ?

    • avatar
      Duncan

      American English :) brought to you by the country where people don’t know if the English speak English . . . . . . . Frankly that only really matters in written form and the entire spelling process of the English language is as messed up as it can be. The upside of English, it’s formed from several other languages and so has commonality with many languages. The downside of English spelling, it is form from several languages and so has many ways to spell the same words and has synonyms coming out of it’s ears. Very inefficient in written form. Somebody should really look into that.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      Let me correct you – English does have many synonyms but for example, it is 4 times bigger than French and thus one can avoid synonyms whether written or spoken IF you really care to.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @ Tarquin, did I say the synonyms were unavoidable? I was pointing out that the language has baggage. Making learning to write it when there’s duplicate words all with the same meaning but not always the same rules of spelling is a downside.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      Nope, but your eagerness to want to re-form English is illustrative of a 1984-style newspeak zealot and should be avoided.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Zealot? Nobody’s ever said I was a zealot before! :)
      But seriously the language (in written form) is in need of some work to optimise it. I don’t see how that makes for “new speak” as it’s the spelling where the brunt of the problem lies. As for zealousness, if my car (which I wouldn’t trade for any other car available) had a problem with it’s brakes I would fix them. It’s logicality if anything, not zealotry.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      ‘Optimise’ the English language? Are you a Dalek old chap? ;)

      FYI, the beauty of English is that it ‘remembers’ i.e. it does not discard inputs to itself from other languages and thus languages such as French or German will always be remembered/traceable through figments of English language linguistic DNA.

      For that reason (one of several) when other languages like French or German become ostensibly obsolete, elements of their respective existence/heritage will always be around, if English does, after all, become the lingua franca.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin, nope not a Dalek. As for the statement about the beauty of English, I’d not really thought of English as a beautiful language, just functional. It’s far too mongrel to be beautiful. But I would definitely have to disagree about the statement that it never leaves any of it’s past behind being a good thing. It’s why the grammar and spelling are all over the place. Too to two, through tough, sail sale, the list of same sound, different spelling is near limitless. This makes it extremely tricky for non natives (and let’s face it, some natives) of the language to have a very difficult time with writing. I mean there are even pop songs where the lyrics spell out Y.O.U.R. Instead of Y.O.U.’R.E. And nobody noticed, it got released into the music charts like that! If you want to maintain correct spelling in the language I’d suggest simplification. Otherwise the chavs will keep doing it themselves. Innit!

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      I did not say that English was a beautiful language – I merely waxed lyrical about the ‘open’ culture that supports said language, for example, its high number of synonyms is a legacy of cultural acceptance into the language from other languages/cultures.

      Also, the flexibility of English allowing great word play, puns and even SMS ‘text speak’ just magnify the importance of English.

      Finally, by maintaining a nod to the words adopted from other languages by importing the spelling, the English language provides a respectful association with the cultures that it encounters and that each mutually shape each other.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin, well then I guess that’s where we’ll have to disagree. I would much sooner look to the future and try to mould it in the best way possible (which would include history lessons in schools btw) than to cling to the past, prohibiting positive change. If I wanted to do that I’d have voted remain in the referendum.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      I think you’ve posted a response to a different question?

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin, nope. I don’t do that as it would make anyone attempting to follow the conversation’s job more difficult. You say a reason to not change the spelling/grammar of English to streamline the learning process and reduce spelling and grammar errors is because it is a nod to the historic route languages that English is formed from to have situations where through, borough, tough & plough are all spelled the same but are sounded differently. And where and wear and sale and sail and their and there are all spelled differently despite being sounded out the same. Far from an exhaustive list but as examples that will do.
      My view is that we should look towards the future of the language and try to make it the best possible future it could be (as in everything else) and I can see huge benefits to cleaning up the way we write English down. Also, it’s not a new or unique outlook I’m taking here. Gaol is now spelled jail for instance. Prior to the first English dictionary, people could and did use any spelling they liked. Progress can be a good thing. It’s also inevitable.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      I’m afraid we’ll have to agree to disagree old chap.

  35. avatar
    Gabriele De Rosa

    I guess English is and always will be the only language that allow all people worldwide to communicate each other and mainly in EU

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      I believe you Duncan…

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      Spanish is by far the best Latin language but it’s language footprint is inferior to English.

      Nonetheless, I am learning Spanish due to its global fecundity and not due to its limited facundity.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin, yes I agree. English still makes more sense than Spanish. But it’s the second best alternative as far as I can see for international relations.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      Have you any facts to support your premise please given that English is the most widely spoken language (native and otherwise) language in the world please?

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @ Tarquin, English only tops the list of spoken languages when you include numbers for second languages, so now that correction is out of the way let me again mention I think English is the better choice (for the reason given above that it is the most globally available language) so not sure why you asked for evidence to support my premise despite you then stating my 1st choice would be the best choice. And finally yes I can produce plenty of evidence to support my premise that Spanish as a language for international communication purposes would make a good (if not best) option. But really since a simple google search can provide most of this evidence I’ll just make some statements here and then give you one link.
      Spanish as a language is prevalent in Spain, South America, and parts of Central America. As a result of migration form those regions it is also a very widely used language in many parts of the USA. So you then from that spread of Spannish speakers ability to communicate across America the continent, as well as Europe due to migration laws allowing Spanish speakers to migrate across the EU from Spain. This would be a significant advantage over French speakers (small part of Canada, some parts of north Africa, Europe) or German speakers (just Europe) that the EU could talk to without English as a go between language. Also, I will say that I am aware there will be small numbers that speak french or German elsewhere, but that number will be small and far less likely to just conveniently be available to talk to in a given situation.
      As promised my one link

    • avatar
      Duncan
    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      Spanish as a native language:

      has a very, very small footprint in Africa – c2million perhaps?
      has an almost negligible footprint in Oceania – c6000 perhaps?
      has an even smaller toenail-print in Asia – c3000 perhaps?

      English dominates Spanish on all continents EXCEPT South America.

      Despite that, I’ve given up on French and I am learning Spanish as its the 2nd (below English) most widely spoken alphabetised language in the world.

      BTW, don’t forget to supply the link you mentioned, DE may have filtered it out if you have already tried.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin, tried twice. Once in same post as comment, second in a subsequent post. Hence the blank comment. It was basically a link to a website of a university that had compiled a database of second languages around the world. Again, very easy to find it using google.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      I believe you Duncan but how IT illiterate are you if you cannot get your URL past DE’s filter?

      Try a bit harder next time, perhaps you could use Google to find out how to solve your problem?

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin, since I’ve only ever used my smart phone and not my pc to communicate on this forum, I must suffer a few IT downsides for doing so. The biggest being the auto correct making spelling mistakes by substituting in the wrong word. Not being able to post a hyperlink is hardly the end of the world and it doesn’t make what I say any less accurate.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      LOL!
      Your posting has only confirmed my belief that you are not the most IT literate old chap.

      Never mind…

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin. I really struggle to see the relevance of my I.T. Capabilities to the subject matter. But since you are so fascinated I will tell you I would put my I.t. Software skills at middling. Able to utilise programmes that are created by others but with no code writing capabilities. I would put my hardware skills somewhere above average, able to strip and rebuild most electronic devices, not just pc’s. Hope that helps.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      LOL!

      Might I refer you to the ‘First Law of Holes’.

      :)

      Your poor IT skills are of interest as your “smart phone v pc argument” is superfluous if not fallacious when discussing why you could not get your URL accepted by DE.

      I’m still waiting for your evidential URL old bean…

  36. avatar
    Barbara Szela Lesniak

    Of course, it will. It’s a language of science, technology, medicine – modern Latin. I guess it’s the stupid EU leaders’ dream to make English dead.

    • avatar
      Paula

      It was the same with French before and tbh probably it will be the same with Chinese in a few decades ;)

    • avatar
      Basia

      Danuta Hübner, a Polish MEP for the centre-right European People’s Party (EPP), and Chair of the European Parliament’s Committee on Constitutional Affairs says, “Over the decades, English has become the international language. We have also, throughout the history of European integration, developed everything that we have produced in English, in terms of laws, in terms of all sorts of initiatives that have the format of written documents. So, I see no reason to stop using this language.”

  37. avatar
    Remi Depernet

    English is still spoken in the US, so I guess the 53rd state called EU will keep speaking English

  38. avatar
    Mark Fairfield

    Charge the EU to use it….or insist on Greek becoming the first language in the European Parliament…they’re the only ones paying for it.

  39. avatar
    Vitor De Carvalho

    Lol… Hell, no! British will remain in EU, this all process is just a lie… Do you ever think they will give up on you?

  40. avatar
    Mimi B

    Yes, we should say “no” to English, unless Ireland or/and Malta decide to change their official language in the EU to English. The European Union adopts the official languages of its member states and employs citizens of its member states. If the UK is not a member state and no other member state has chosen English as their official language withing the union, then it’s simply wrong to keep English as a working language – and then there’s the argument about UK nationals working in EU bodies and institutions. I’m sorry, but the EU is not about feelings or how any single person feels about anything. There is only one way for democracy to work and that is by strictly following rules which apply to everyone. And the EU should be about promoting western values (democracy being the first and most important among them), not about business or the common sentiment of those with inferiority complex that we should put our rules, values and traditions aside and accept a generic world were everyone speaks very poor English.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Wow, ok. So in your mind there is 0% non-EU born workforce within the EU? Also, English already is an official language in Ireland and Malta. As stated several times above. You think democracy is a western value? I’d say capitalism wins over democracy everytime, but ok that’s your opinion I guess.

    • avatar
      Andrea

      One thing you wrote sounds reasonable: “the EU is not about feelings or how any single person feels about anything”. The others sound just like feelings of yours.

  41. avatar
    Balbina Oliveira

    PLease, keep English as the working language! Think of all the poor English teachers out there, trying to make a living!”!!!

  42. avatar
    Tom Doran

    Well us English don’t give a rat’s arse if the Eurocrats want to cut their noses off to spite their faces cos we’re out of that mess soon! But it will be more pointless chaos red tape and directives for the unelected elites to get stuck into as they all force themselves to learn Klingon or Swahili or whatever :)

  43. avatar
    Paula

    This is really funny. Brits should let other people debate this.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Paula
      Why?

      Do you not believe in democracy?

      Has the UK actually left the EU yet?

  44. avatar
    Tom Doran

    Or create a new language entirely. Can call it ‘Newspeak’ and take out all those pesky Europhobic words like ‘democracy’ ‘transparency’ ‘accountability’ and ‘sovereignty’. Doubleplusgood!

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Tomm Doran
      BRILLIANT POST!
      Bravo Sir!

  45. avatar
    Sergio Ruiz

    Just check the language of the post and the language people are using to comment. Esperanto, German. Right.

  46. avatar
    Fernando Leite Velho

    Enfim, sendo o português e o castelhano linguas das mais faladas do mundo e com a quantidade de portugueses dessiminados por toda Europa, chama muito a atenção que não apareça nenhuma palavra metendo estas duas linguas, que se vaiam à porra esta Europa com tintes colonialistas.

  47. avatar
    marco trebbi

    esperanto estas neutrala lingvo, la plej bona

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Marco Thresh
      The only people who think Esperanto is a neutral language are the ‘Desperanto’ idjits that have bothered to learn Dalek I mean Esperanto.

  48. avatar
    Stefania Portici

    spagnolo e italiano sono molto simili, ci si capisce abbastanza tra noi anche senza studiare la lingua . Ad ogni modo la lingua che unisce i popoli europei è quella che siamo , quella che ci appartiene ed è il latino e il greco , non capisco perchè non è stato fatto imponendo l’inglese che è estraneo alla nostra storia . Nessuno dice che non si debba studiare l’inglese , certo che si , ma ci è estranea

    • avatar
      Andrea

      Sia gentile, parli per sé. A noi non è affatto estranea.

  49. avatar
    Merkurio

    If it wasn’t for the US, English would be behind French and Spanish as chosen learnt languages. Since western europe understands French it is up to central/western europe to choose between German and English.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Well, I think the empire and the desire to trade.the world over had a part to play in the spread of use of English. After all, it’s why parts of Quebec speak French, and most of South America speak Spanish with Portugese being in second place. But this debate isn’t why do people speak English, it’s actually not relevant WHY, it only matters for here and now that they do. Dropping it’s use in the EU would be irrational, counter productive to trade and politics with non-EU nations, and would also probably give the Irish Republic a big headache internally too.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Merkurio

      What Europe do you live on?

      Western Europe understands English more than French. What Europe do you live on?

  50. avatar
    John Miguel

    Aomenos os ingleses vão continuar a falar inglês nos qualquer dia o que nos resta é falar árabich

  51. avatar
    Nuno Dos Santos

    Yes it will. Its international language….in Portugal nowadays its an issue about french, germa n etc, and other minoritarian languages. In the Algarve we speak Português and English. The other linguages if they choose Algarve to live…better learn portuguese or english. French, German, Dutch I only speak with my friends, ok?

  52. avatar
    Ryan E. Mellor

    Only Malta and Ireland 3.5 million out of 430 million will speak English as there mother tongue! How ironic !!

  53. avatar
    Mark Smit

    Of course. It’s the world language, like it or not. I’m pretty radical in this. I see languages as a major handicap. I’d happily drop my native language and never use it again if we could all move on and start using the same language. It would take about 40 years, max. I’ll be dead but still better for future generations.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      I actually agree with this sentiment. Although probably a better solution would be a phase out system. I know people who suck at language and could never hope to learn a new one completely. But bring it in at the school level today, give it 10 years to have all public signs co written with it, then by 40-60 years time scrap native languages. But who would write the new language? Tolkien is deceased and I cannot think of anyone more suited to the job!

  54. avatar
    Bernard Biggar

    This is a non issue since , as it has already been pointed out, English is an official language of Ireland , Cyprus and Malta! It is also the language that people from different countries mainly use to communicate with each other !

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Preservation of culture is a separate issue. And frankly since languages are constantly evolving i would argue that it’s impossible to preserve the Heritage’ of a language without making it a dead language in order to preserve it.

    • avatar
      Andrea

      I’d rather preserve intelligence, that can thrive in any culture and language.

  55. avatar
    Peter Samuel Legon

    Probably not as the EU project has nothing to do with commonsense and pragmatism, and everything to do with autocratic ideology.

  56. avatar
    Jean-Paul Schats

    Maybe Turkish or Arabic should be the new language. After all, with Frau Merkel in charge, Europe will change in Eurabia

  57. avatar
    Andrej Němec

    What about a Slavic language?
    440 000 000 native speakers stretching from Central Europe to Alaska..

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Andrej Němec
      Not really. Slavic nations have poor histories regarding ‘rule of law’, democracy, corruption etc etc

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Tarquin, your claim that the spread of language has anything to do with politics is just ridiculous. What about slavery, colonialism, exploitation and forced integration? Is English a good candidate?

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Yasmine
      Please point me to the claim of which you refer to?

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @yasmine, what about them? Do the problems of the past have any relevance to a languages usefulness in the current and future global society? The basic reasoning behind keeping English as a language is people already use it more than any other language. (and I’m talking from a point of view that more people can use it to communicate, not suggesting I’ve analysed every conversation and done a word count tally for each language). It also works well as a language, there are no underlying problems in it’s day to day use as a result of lack of expression or description capability. And to replace English with another language would be costly. Especially since for that cost you get what you had before you spent it. A language most people/all large organisations can use to interact and communicate with. It would be like taking a car to the scrapyard and having it crushed even though it has no faults. Then buying another car. What would be the purpose of replacing it?

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Just make sure you divert attention to technicalities so that you avoid responding to substance.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Yasmine
      Ditto.

      In answer to the forum question, my answer is “YES”!

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Duncan, I think you want to be addressing Tarquin or someone else… My response was to his and to show that his reasoning is not valid. Indeed, my post addresses him.

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Tarquin, the claim is in your own response to Andrej. Just read it, if you have forgotten it…you go round in circles trying to disguise the fact that you have no arguments but are just here to throw dirt on specific cultures and people.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Yasmine, am I avoiding substance by pointing out your observations are as relevant to today and the future of the world as “I lost my 1st tooth when I was 5.”? So lets suppose you are right, and any country language from a country with a ‘dodgy past’ ought to not be allowed to be used. So list of ‘not allowed’ options (in no particular order, and far far far from complete) are English, French, Dutch, German, Spanish, Italian, Chinese (any form), Japanese, Korean, Russian, Portugese, Hungarian, Serbian, polish, Ukrainian, Latvian, Norwegian, Finnish, Danish, Swedish, Arabic (any form), so on and so forth. The lid of allowed languages is .
      Congratulations, for historical reasons you’ve banned every language ever used by anyone (don’t think the Klingon empire or elves from lord of the rings have model histories either) so nobody should be allowed to speak in any language. Does this embargo extend to non vocal communication such as morse code, semaphore or sign language?

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Yasmine
      FYI, not all cultures are equal, not all countries are equal, some countries like Slavic ones are far more corrupt than say Scandinavian or Teutonic or Anglosphere nations – refer yourself to Transparency Internation for elucidation.

      I am sorry if you come from such a blighted country BUT please remember that over time countries can change, cultures can change and say in the not so near future (a few epochs from now perhaps) your country or culture could be better than many listed above it in TI’s annual corruption index.

      English should remain the de facto EU language, if not it should be German or French or perhaps Spanish – but definitely not a Slavic language imbued with its negative cultural baggage and in a lot of cases too many letters courtesy of St Cyril.

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Tarquin, as usual, you have failed to grasp the meaning of my post, or, perhaps, it is just convenient for you to pretend that you have, and have just resorted to repeating the same racist and chauvinistic little theory that resides in your head and doesn’t even include yourself. You are trying to demean people for not coming from a country/culture that yourself has said you don’t come from….sadly, as previously said, I cannot offer professional help, as indeed neither can this page.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Yasmine
      Zzzzzz, usual emotional bilge.

      Zzzzzz, usual attempt at trying to employ the race card when the issue is culture.

      Zzzzzz, like I have repeatedly said, if you want your culture to be considered in a positive light by me and many, many others then either change it internally (that should take you a few decades) or get a new passport and immerse yourself in a superior culture.

      No culture is perfect, but some are better than others – you just happen to have drawn the short straw re your own culture BUT you can change your culture.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin, can you explain your rationality here? Implying one culture is more or less corrupt than another based on the genetic sub-groups and/or language base of that culture seems to be . . . . . Well reminiscent of one A.Hitler’s way of thinking quite frankly. The source of the data, do they factor in all other elements and aspects of that culture? Such as historical influence of the roman catholic church, the axis powers, the ottoman empire, the mongol horde, the USSR etc? Because I find it extremely difficult to take seriously the notion that somebody of Slavic decent is more likely to be corrupt than someone of English decent based on nothing more than the native language and/or the nature of the decent. So can you either validate the claim as legitimately solely connected to these points or stop using the claim to talk trash about somebody else. It is beneath adult discussion and frankly I think it beneath childish discussion since if my 10-year old spoke this way I would be shocked and appalled at her.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      It appears that you have [deliberately?] misunderstood the difference between race and culture.

      My culture is British, my race is 50% Caucasoid and 50% Negroid – thus I find your Hitler comments both juvenile and risible.

      On the culture issue, look at these [what you would INCORRECTLY call racist but] factually correct assertions:

      In the British black community, one particular culture is associated with the pursuit of academic qualifications.

      Another culture within the British black community is associated with gang violence.

      In the UK white community, one particular white culture is associated with pick-pocketing.

      In the UK white community, another culture is associated with taking more out of the UK benefits system than putting in.

      I have seen statistics that back up all of the preceding cultural associations – in short, some cultures are better than others, some cultures are worse than others.

      This is a fact, read it, absorb it, accept it, get over it and move on.

      For you to deny that some cultures are better or worse than others is not only untrue but palpably offensive.

      Yes, one would like all cultures to have equal merit and equal value [however said attributes are measured] but the fact is they don’t!

      FTR, not all Slavic nations are IMHO culturally ‘lacking’ – I have a very fond spot for Poland, a great country with a great culture.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Tarquin. I’m well aware of the difference between race and culture. However, since this is supposed to be a language based discussion and you are implying some form of cultural skew in level of corruption i stand by my comparison to A.Hitler since he was very good at pigeonholing entire peoples into categories of good and bad rather than basing each person on individual merit. I didn’t know, or need to know your race to be able to deduce you were categorising people.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Duncan
      It is clear that you didn’t read or perhaps didn’t understand my posting or are you one of those PC zealots that are destroying free speech, democracy and accountability?

      I always find it strange that people positively accept positive cultural characteristics like music, food, literature and the like but then refuse to accept factually supported negative characteristics like a propensity toward corruption, lack of respect for rule of law, paedophilia.

      You can confuse race and culture all you like my ‘PC zealot protagonist’ or should that be ‘Goebbels propagandist’?

      PS: BTW, checkout the “Sapir-Whorf hypothesis” if you wish to understand this issue better as you are clearly ‘under-informed’ shall we say. If you do, you may well understand why English should remain the de facto EU language, given that many other EU languages are reflective of cultures that are historically, presently and endemically, relatively corrupt when contrasted with English. Language is influenced by its speakers, speakers influence their language – I hope you can understand such a concept. Then again, I won’t be holding my breath, judging by your illogical and foolish postings…

    • avatar
      Duncan

      culture/ˈkʌltʃə/

      noun
      1.the arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively.
      2.the ideas, customs, and social behaviour of a particular people or society.
      3.the cultivation of bacteria, tissue cells, etc. in an artificial medium containing nutrients.
      4.the cultivation of plants
      but I would in fact put it to you that you examples above were in fact

      subculture/ˈsʌbkʌltʃə/

      noun
      a cultural group within a larger culture, often having beliefs or interests at variance with those of the larger culture.
      I am not misunderstanding what culture means, far from it. You on the other hand seem to simultaneously be suggesting that a culture within an are of Europe could have been excluded of other skin colours until very recently, unless imposed upon them in the middle ages by the uprising of the mongolian empire, or the ottoman empire, or to have that diversity further reduced by the axis powers in 1937-1945. And for you to also not be suggesting that an attack on somebodies culture has a racial component? Is the problem you have no knowledge of history? As for why you struggle to see why people would accept negative aspects of a culture . . . . Would you accept them? Music, art, literature are invited into other cultures as human expressiveness. Crime and anti social behaviour are not welcomed in. But here is where your argument really falls to pieces for me.

      corruption/kəˈrʌpʃ(ə)n/

      noun
      1.dishonest or fraudulent conduct by those in power, typically involving bribery.
      2.the process by which a word or expression is changed from its original state to one regarded as erroneous or debased.
      3.the process of decay; putrefaction.

      Which of these do you think would apply across an entire community or culture? As for corruption levels amongst English speakers, let’s take a look at the passed few years and focus just on politicians I the UK shall we? They (not all, but a large group of them) were found to be cheating the expense system. The ones found to be guilty of defrauding money from the government (a criminal act) did not do jail time, and in many cases kept their jobs. Does that not sound corrupt? No? Ok let’s skip forward now to the referendum debate. David Cameron was offering knighthoods to people who should have been impartial advice givers to publically side with remain, bribery is corrupt right? These are just two examples out of many that we know about from one small focus group of people with power to corrupt. From one small country of English speakers. I can name many more examples of corruption in my own country and a few from USA another English speaking nation. Enough examples in fact for me to be absolutely certain that corruption is proportional within the English speaking cultures of the world. And what’s more since people in positions of power in none English speaking cultures are also more likely to speak English as a second language (for business and international negotiations) your argument is invalid, since the sub-culture of people in power in that culture (the ones who can be corrupt) are likely to culturally speak English as well as say for example Hungarian. Your statistics should in fact show English speaking corruption in Hungary, but it does not.

      “I was threatened with a knife by a gypsy”
      Using this setence select statements which are true from below
      1:only gypsies carry knives
      2:all knife crime can be linked to gypsies
      3:all gypsies carry knives and threaten other people with them
      4:I’m a little bit racist for feeling I had to mention it was a gypsy that threatened me.
      5:I was the victim of a crime.
      6:because a crime was committed between two people of different culture it is a hate crime and should be treated differently from other knife crime.
      The fact is that statistics are often misrepresented and even when they are not they do not give a broader outlook. Corruption is in all cultures, does that mean everyone is corrupt? No of course not. In much the same way as spikes in corruption in a given area will not have anything but the loosest link to language.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      @Duncan just ignore him, it seems he blindly believes in the strong version of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis he really can’t understand (he is using that _hypothesis_ with languages, speakers and their cultures like hitler with different races) http://linguistlist.org/ask-ling/sapir.cfm

      I wonder how did the world survived to the lack of English worlwide and its constant and superior culture/ mindset/ values…

      This kind of people scare me to death… As if someone who speaks X language is somehow condamned to become a paedophile just because stats show that (two unrelated facts, paedophilia is NOT a language issue, the cause can be found in the situation around them: war, trauma, a “bad” gene that activates when some people get traumatised/consume drugs, pedophilia on them (>trauma), still a lack of policies against/to prevent it (>more trauma), a less rich country (the richer, the less traumas and difficulties), etc)

      For example statistically in the USA there are more black people in jails compared to white people (ohh! They both speak English!) because of these kind of average factors: the corrupt/inmoral English man made black people slaves and inferior for centuries, therefore we can still see (average) they have less money, less oportunities, less education, more traumas, so they commit more crimes, they are harder treated by somehow racist policemen that can freely shoot anyone, etc

      A culture isn’t superior to others, it just happens that different countries are now performing better or worse in different fields and people living in those countries follow different trends according to the local progress (or its lack/regression). A language just helps having better access to good/bad things those countries have and maybe imitate them (usually people imitate policies/values that seem better for their local situation), following trends in the same language community. Those trends caused by a shared language maybe are one of the reasons why the USA spied on Merkel’s phones and other governments bu not on English speaking countries… Should i blame a whole culture/language/people for spying on allies? Would that be a good value of the English culture superiority? :/

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu FB
      In your own words:

      “A culture isn’t superior to others, it just happens that different countries are now performing better or worse in different fields…”

      You have proven my case.
      I rest my case.
      QED!

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      This Tarquin is being very stupid, he can’t even read and understand sentences properly.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu FB
      Please recall, you have been tested, bested and jested.

      Deal with it, wallow in it, get over it and jog on.

      PS: Not all cultures are equal, some cultures have a tendency to argue the toss even when they have lost the argument, other cultures accept the results and move on. English [indeed English culture] does have its weaknesses but in the context of this debate it should remain the de facto EU official language.

    • avatar
      Debating Europe

      We would ask all participants to show respect to everybody in the debate, and to refrain from personal attacks. Please debate the arguments themselves, not the people in the debate.

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Tarquin, there is nothing emotional in my post and even if there was, this still would not make it wrong. You are just looking for a way to demean my response to you and detract from the substance of its content, namely the fact that I have referred you to my original post and your obvious inability to counter it. You don’t want it to be obvious that your initial response to Andrej does not stand and you have lost this debate.

      As to Debating Europe, what you define as personal attacks is subjective; it doesn’t break the law and with Tarquin is inevitable. This is because his posts have no substance to respond to but only showcase his personality. And people respond to this. He has the option of not posting here. We don’t need nannies. Thanks.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Yasmine
      I’m sorry Yasmine but my point stands – you are far too emotional on occasion. Indeed your last posting suggested that I had nothing to respond to and yet you still responded?!?!?

      Please be rational and logical and keep to the forum question – to wit my answer is yes!

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      Tarqui, the point was about language which was the subject of this debate and you have lost it. Move on like a grown-up man. Don’t try and turn it personal or make it look like the debate was about something else. It just makes you look even worse.

  58. avatar
    Fredrik Dunge

    Honestly we should try to phase it out over the comming generations. What should become the new lingua franca? Whaever comes naturally, let’s jsut put some money into trying to get people to learn more european languages and whatever happens to become the most useful language of communication will be so, my guess would be french, german has more speakers but french is easier for the romance countries and they outnumber the germanics. Truth be told we may end up with two spheres a romance sphere, and a germanic one.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Fredrik Dunge
      Your 1st and 3rd sentences are contradictory!
      LOL!

  59. avatar
    Pierre Gorre

    Parmi d’autres actions concrètes, l’Union Européenne devrait promouvoir le multilinguisme (2, 3 ou 4, y compris une land=gue régionale, comme le basque ou le corse, et bien d’autres!!) chez tous les citoeyns européesn et quelque soit leur age!!). Among many other concrete actions, the European Union should promote multilingualism among its citizens, whatever their age.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Pierre Gorre
      Great idea!

      I’m still waiting for the French (contrary to UN pronouncements) to allow, facilitate and accept Occitan, Basque and Corsican to be taught in schools AND supported in the media though!

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @D’haillecourt Thierry
      Please refer to the post by “Jean Pierre Quinart” for sense and sensibility on this matter.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Bruno Bernard
      Yet another reason why English is the best EU language – its part French, part German and part several other languages.

      It truly is a lingua franca, growing all the time!

  60. avatar
    Lisa Corbani

    either they find a way to make another language be studied all over the EU like English is or they have no possibility to substitute it, it’s a matter of pragmatism

  61. avatar
    Barbara Szela Lesniak

    If not English for EU, then Arabic is the only natural change in the way the majority is to communicate and I don’t think they are going to ask you opinions on whatever any more….

  62. avatar
    Lonzo Bildelberg

    English was never the european common language directly because of the UK, but because all the world recognizes it as the common language

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Lonzo Bildelberg
      Don’t forget that as well as the USA, English is the only language with more than 5 first-world economies* – a testament to its flexibility and facundity!

      *USA, UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland, Eire + numerous other English speaking territories.

    • avatar
      EU citizen

      Tarquin this really makes me laugh

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @EU Citizen
      Your name tickles me too, thanks!

  63. avatar
    Vera Cardoso

    The lingua franca will always remain the one that is more widely spoken, the one that is more present in media and entertainment, the one that is more useful in trade, transport… English. Works for Europe and intercontinental relations.

  64. avatar
    Clément Manenti

    Le français est plus parlé.
    Et l anglais ne représente plus que l Irlande et le Luxembourg.
    L Allemand est beaucouo employé aussi.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Clément Manenti
      Only in your perverted Francophonefascist dreams!

    • avatar
      Andrea

      French has had its day. Deal with it.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Andrea, I see no reason French should fall out of use entirely, Welsh and Gaelic are still surviving. Even some native American languages are still in use. But it’s a matter of practicality that when speaking to a wider audience a common language is needed. At one time Latin was the order of the day, but since it hasn’t evolved with the times these days it’s more of a guide for how to create new words (mostly in the sciences). English is already a common language it’s irrational to replace it. It could do with some of the inherited spelling and grammar improving, but there’s nit much else going against it.

  65. avatar
    Pedro Freitas

    Why not portuguese or spanish? Those are in the TOP5 most spoken languages in the world! And what the hell is German doing there? Or Italian? Noone speaks those languages unless people who actually live there.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Pedro Freitas
      Because NO Lusophone nation is considered a true 1st-world nation.

      Because Lusophonia is associated with corruption – please see TI for confirmation.

      Spanish has a better position in this regard than Portuguese – but it too is considered more fecund than facund for the last 3 centuries and so its ‘lingua franca position’ is lower when contrasted with English.

  66. avatar
    Paula Daian

    Yeah because Brexit will change the world as we know it. Get real, people – English is the language of the world, not of the European Union. And since the European Union is an organization meant to deal outwards as well, it will always stay English, as long as the rest of the world does the same.

  67. avatar
    Danny Boy

    Well without English i’m afraid this forum is going to have to do without my wise council as shamefully it’s the only language I speak.And I was born in West Germany.

  68. avatar
    Urkreator

    What EUROPE needs is a COMMON language.

    1) We should start with Indo-European roots that are common to most European Languages, for ex. pater (father), sol (sun), sed- (to sit), sta- (to stand), mor (death), mar (sea), sop- (sleep), kon- (know), tu (you), ne (not), tri (3), du (2), des (10)… etc.
    The advantage of using the I-E common roots is that they don’t always favour the same languages (i-e Romance for Interlingua), but all European languages in turns.

    2) This common European language should be SIMPLE (simpler than English or Esperanto)
    – Basic words should be monosyllabic as in English, so that they could be used to form compounds that are not too long.
    – The pronunciation should be simple, close to that of Italian.
    – The grammar should be simpler than English grammar (no accusatives as in Esperanto, no adjective agreement in gender and number as in Romance L., no auxiliaries in the negative and interrogative as in English)

    3) This common language would be more than a simple communication tool: it would be the cement holding European peoples together, a proof that we belong to the same civilisation.

    This language already EXISTS, it is called Uropi, a common language for Europe
    https://sites.google.com/…/uropi…/small-uropi-grammar-rn
    De miki Prins (the little Prince) has recently been published in a bilingual version: Uropi – French (Edition Tintenfaß).
    There is more to it on:
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/1512985489002462/permalink/1574356652865345/

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Europe would be better with Esperanto (the most pragmatic and developed auxlang), Uropi (I don’t know that one, nor know if someone already had a fluent conversation with another one), or any other auxlang that proves people can speak and works much better (compared to ethnic languages).

      In the case of new auxlangs as Uropi, they should be copyright free (as Esperanto) and could be quickly developed and tested by interlinguists, polyglots, translators, etc to finally get into institutions. In my opinion the differences between Uropi and Esperanto could just be quantitative (as other auxlangs that people can converse with), the differences between ethnic languages and auxlangs are QUALITATIVE.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Urkreator
      Forget Esperanto, you’ve just proposed Effperanto!
      LOL!

  69. avatar
    Pedro Vaz

    Apparently Arab is the new EU official language. I actually believe that English might be a little racist, xenophobic, populist, anti immigrant, anti refugee, etc, etc..

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Wow so now even our language is racist? That’s quite an impressive feat given it’s Celtic, Germanic, French, Norse and Latin ancestry!

    • avatar
      Andrea

      Your beliefs may be actual in your mind, but luckily it seems they are not outside.

  70. avatar
    Elisabete Tavares

    Se há outras línguas, das mais faladas no mundo, como o espanhol e o português, não se entende manutenção do inglês com o brexit. Isto sem falar do francês….

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Elisabete Tavares
      Maybe the fact that there are at least 5 top-tier English speaking nations and only 1 (France), perhaps 2 (Italy) top tier Latin speaking nations may be a reason why Spanish is not looked on as a language of the fecund rather than the facund!

  71. avatar
    Mário Rui Dos Santos

    Well.. I agree that English should remain as the common language only because the language is simple and any idiot can learn it..

    • avatar
      Eugen Fabian

      Màrio! Mi idioto, sukcesas legi angle. Vi alia idioto, sukcesas eĉ skribi ĝin. Ĉu viaj samlandanoj kiuj regas multe malpli la anglan ol ni, estas multe pli ol idiotoj ol ni? Cetere, ĉu vi sukcesas ankaŭ paroli ĝin perfekte? Komplimentojn! Kie vi lernis ĝin? ;-) https://www.facebook.com/ievgendudi/videos/477460779099823/

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Eugen, let us not split hairs here. The language is not difficult to learn to speak is the point that Mario was making. I’m sure there are people who cannot. And it probably has less to do with stupidity (I hate that word as it seems to victimise the poorly educated and those who are not academically minded when in fact these peoples brains will most often have advantages of another kind, such as technical, social, artistic or coordination skills) than a lack of need/opportunity to learn it.

  72. avatar
    Federico Amorino

    Although its status could be undermined by brexit, i guess until Ireland (and Malta) remain in the EU English has to be official language, being it in those countries.

  73. avatar
    Stefanie Müller

    If you want to work in Europe, please register on jobsallovereurope.com. Upload your Video CV for free.

  74. avatar
    Jean Mardaga

    Yes, the English language will remain an official working language of the European Institutions.

  75. avatar
    Stefan Ritscher

    One of those many useless regulations to make the EU inefficient and the most useless institution. within over 20 years they have managed near nil rules to make live in Europe easier for normal, non-millionaire people.
    Insurances, car regulations, road taxes, VAT, resident status.. , banana curvature, cucumber regulations..
    But TTIP and ECB work perfect for the Europeans…

  76. avatar
    Stefano Zuzzi

    By the time that the UK
    is out of the EU I don’t think is wise to make the English language the one.
    But meanwhile try to tell it
    to the Dutch and
    the Greek.

  77. avatar
    Alex Escomu FB

    1) English should be a working language, but not de facto anymore! (and it should replace Maltese or Irish, and after agreement of all EU states and some changes in law to make this possible)
    ⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆
    2) English should be replaced by Esperanto as “the new de facto working language” and the other working languages should be steadily, in medium long term be put on a lower resource-consuming level, as EQUAL de jure and de facto national languages, and maybe mainly for important tranlations for common citizens (if machine translation is improved much more, EU could easily translate much more texts from Esperanto, a way less ambiguous language than English. About Esperanto and Google Translate: https://translate.googleblog.com/2012/02/tutmonda-helplingvo-por-ciuj-homoj.html )

    It was hilarious reading this 100% correct sentence “politics doesn’t always add up rationally”. The writer ignored Esperanto, and Grin’s report that concludes Esperanto is the best solution for EU (and the world I would add) because it is a way more rational solution in middle and long term than English (in the middle-long run Esperanto is more pragmatic, cheaper, fairer, easier, more efficient solution). English is the most widely used language but also a flaw international language (Readers, give in it is an ethnic language, it is not a social human invention/construction made to work as a bridge language but to work fine within it’s borders [better than Esperanto for this purpose!]. As Chinese or any big or little ethnic language it brings outside its borders a specific own ethnic culture, slang, too many idioms, too high cost to learn or master it, too many privileges to the chosen ethnic group, too many inequialities to the rest of peoples, etc). Repeat after me… “English has no characteristics that make it better than Esperanto for international purposes, now way!” “It is just currently there because of a former English empire and now a mighty USA, it is a matter of time it will be replace by another ethnic language as French was replaced before… making the same mistake and dumping resources all over the world that could be save through any auxlang that is more or less well made”
    About Grin’s report: http://goo.gl/rTu2jC
    About the author https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fran%C3%A7ois_Grin
    ⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆
    3) Europeans should still focus on learning big languages at least in the short-term to remain competitive. In the middle-long term people just learn whatever language they want, a big one, the neighbour’s or friend’s one… Esperanto will be there (accepted as the first 2nd language at schools in the whole world, I would guess), learned maybe in 2 years at school (maybe 3 in China) to the same or higher level than currently English during 10 years at school.
    ⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆
    Esperanto beginners and speakers will steadily grow. By 2020 I foresee 5 million learners just on Duolingo’s Esperanto courses. And from then on… more than 2.5M every year https://duolingo.com/course/eo/en (+450.000 learners in 13 months) and very soon my team and I will lauch this one for
    Spanish speakers https://duolingo.com/course/eo/es then in Russian, Portuguese, Chinese…
    ⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆⋆

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Your plan seems immensely ‘long-term’, and would also need a create degree of global cooperation than has ever been seen to date. For now though at least, English is prevalent globally. Unless that changes the EU would be wise to keep using it.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Why the global cooperation? That plan isn’t that long. If tomorrow the EU decided promoting Esperanto (while wisely keeping compulsory English at schools till other continents add up to that Esperanto promotion), I bet in less than a decade we would have more fluent Esperanto L2 speakers in the EU than current L2 English speakers. And the cheaper, fairer and better results teaching/speaking Esperanto than English would easily push other countries to promote Esperanto.

      If many countries of the world are currently teaching English (many just trying to) with no global cooperation at all, after deciding to imitate the EU plan they could easily switch to Esperanto in less than 5/10 years (enough time to get teachers [self]learn Esperanto to a really high level and more courses/resources translated/created).

      In the short term Esperanto would quickly overpass English just because anyone can learn it even home with no teacher (and if they already learned a second language, eg most of them [some] English, they can learn Esperanto faster).
      I am an example of that: C1 level diploma in Esperanto, with no teachers and no previous cram, just 5 months reading courses and 4 years using it till I had the chance to take that official exam.
      And a guy i know that was 15, learned Esperanto home for 6 months, and just after that he passed the B2 exam (when talking with him, i bet he could have passed at least the oral C1 exam, but he wanted to ensure the previous level). A B2 level is what high school students in Spain are expected to get in English after more than 10 years learning it. Needless to say the majority can’t get that level (it’s worse in Asia) and only 23% of Spaniards can hold a conversation (not specified what holding a conversation meant in the research)

    • avatar
      Paul X

      The fundamental question you have not addressed is just why would other major economies want to change their working language?

      In the world of business change for change sake is a big no-no and a change of working language would have enormous cost implications and bring no direct benefits. Just why would the US and China change their business practices just to suit the internal politics of the EU?

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      @Paul X, what do you mean saying “working language” and USA and China changing their “business practices”? For “working language” do you mean changing the language used inside their countries by speakers and government? What are the current business practices for China and USA? (negotiating mainly in English and Chinese though interpreters?).

      After that reply, I’ll be able to give you a answers.

    • avatar
      Paul X

      I work for an international company. We routinely hold meetings both attended and via conference calls with associates and customers from the EU, US, China, South America, Russia among many others, and in all instances, the standard language used is English
      Now I suggest non EU countries will have no inclination what so ever to start learning Esperanto and its use will be restricted internally within the EU which will still have to revert to English for external business therefore the whole exercise would be a pointless waste of time and money

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @ Paul, hence the cooperation required that I mentioned. Getting EVERYONE to agree Esperanto is the way forward to the point they would pay the costs involved in beginning to teach it, change all signs over, republish books etc.
      @Alex, 5-10 years is a very ambitious timetable for replacing languages worldwide. What about people no longer in education? How will they learn this new language? Not everyone has the luxury of time for night classes, so please don’t suggest that as the solution. Also, I’m very much dubious about an artificial language created in 1887 that still hasn’t taken off by 2016 suddenly becoming what everyone wants. P.s. A knife for chopping trees down? That analogy is calling English as a form of communication almost entirely ineffective and unsuitable for purpose from the design concept upwards. When in fact it is a language. And one that works well. If you’d compared it to an axe in your metaphor then maybe. Suggesting the possibility of a “chainsaw” language which would clearly be better. I think a knife for tree felling in communication terms might be something like a mime show, it’s possible to communicate in such a way, but it’s long winded difficult to do and is likely to irritate.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Ok, ask yourself in which language international companies (maybe yours, if more than… 40 years old) spoke 20 years ago, with associates and customers. I bet business practices change depending on the meeting, company, working language, etc and decade to decade, and will keep on changing, so it’s not risky saying Esperanto would be a good option in that hypothetical and possible future

      The only reason why you hold conference calls in English is because customer B C and D have chosen someone who could speak English well enough for actual convenience in that conference. But you can bet a Chinese CEO from a big Chinese company, if he would need to speak personally with you or your boss, he would speak in Chinese through an interpreter. Even if he knew, English he would likely not risk himself being ashamed for mistakes in English). Don’t you have interpreters from time to time in your company? or translators?

      In a bright future for Esperanto starting in the EU, English would be replaced by Esperanto year after year as the most common language everywhere of workers from other nations, just for convenience because for workers/students, etc it would be more appealing learning fluent Esperanto for 2 years at school/class rather than bad English for 10.

      As I see it, you should see and hear the (quite big sometimes) difference too between natives and non natives in those meetings (or any conversation), and notice they are in a lower position to negotiate on equal terms with the company who chose an English native negociator (more confident and expressive since he uses his own language).

    • avatar
      Paul X

      Duncan & Alex
      Yes I understand exactly what you mean by how much co- operation would be needed and the strategy that could be utilised, but the question still stands……why?……I’m afraid despite the high opinion it has of itself, the EU just isn’t influential enough to convince the whole business world to spend billions of pounds teaching people to speak Esperanto when they are getting along just fine using English

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      @Paul: why? a powerful language that means easiness, convenience, cheap language, efficience, better position for negotiating for non English companies (95% of the world speak another language), etc

      The whole business world would switch to the common language that they see is most benefitial for them and most of their workers can speak. Esperanto could easily be introduced at schools as the first second language to learn English faster (2 years learning Esperanto + 6 years learning English = higher level in English than 8 years learning just English). Esperanto would be known and learned and experienced by many more people than right now, and as it is easy and a change of paradigma, it would easily overpass the number of English fluent speakers in every company of the world… and therefore they would start negotiating in Esperanto, they would teach Esperanto to their remaining workers (cheaper investment for better results, since everyone needs less time to learn Esperanto than English). Institutions (schools, universities) are the main investors on language teaching, as far as I know it is not the world of business. And companies would save money and become more efficient, expressive, and fair one to each other if they would stop teaching and they’d start teaching Esperanto to their workers.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Alex. I get that you’re a firm believer in this idea. And (with a few amendments to your planning & timeline) I can even see it working. But, I believe Paul X is wanting to know precisely why it needs to be done. Companies (and schools for that matter) don’t change a light bulb unless the previous one stopped working properly since the cost involved in replacing something that still works correctly is never considered economical. Also, does it really take 8 years to learn to speak English? I was fairly fluent by 2 years old if on somewhat of a limited vocabulary and with no writing ability. And again, when learning languages at school I could pass a basic conversation in French or German after only 6&4 years of education for each respectively (again vocabulary was a possible issue at that point) so it strikes me as odd that it should take so long to learn English in a school environment.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      :) nice light bulb analogy. Continuing with it I would say from time to time companies (and schools) change the light bulb dimmed too much or when they see a brighter light bulb that can recupe the investment in a matter of years. That happened with French a century ago, it could happen with Chinese, at least in Asia in some decades, money would never be an issue (if it were, we would have never left Latin or French).

      Esperanto is a brighter bulb, like LEDs, it’s a new invention which is cheaper, more ecological (one of the things that would protect endangered/minority languages/cultures), user-friendly, etc. The main problem are prejudices against Esperanto (just because of simple ignorance, sometimes maybe egoism) and lack of hope on humanity, and what already has been achieved (because Esperanto is not what most people usually suggest: changing to the new mightiest language [the eternal trend with an powerful nation fiercely backing and pushing it]).

      8 years to speak English? I don’t know, I was talking about getting a B2 level or a fluent level, the same one, in Esperanto (2 years at school) as in English (probably 10 years at school, usually not enough for Spaniards, Chinese, Japanese, etc). It would be great, but I don’t know any stats focused on just speaking lessons in Esperanto and/or English for Swedish, German, Spanish, or Japanese people. I just know a B2 level is what Spaniards are supposed to have when they finish high school (and the majority can’t reach), and my experience or eg the fact a 15 years old Spaniard got his official Esperanto B2 diploma after 6 months with a course home on his hands (I don’t think he spent more than 150h hours=less time spent learning English for 2 years at school. English classes in Spain could vary from 2 hours every week, to 12 hours out of 25 for “bilingual” schools. The average is usually 4 hours a week).

      When people are able to speak English depends on your native language (Swedish VS Chinese), methods (just focusing on speaking, or also listening [you as a baby], writing and reading?), what you mean by “speaking” (eg. tourist level, reading aloud from a booklet “where my hotel? please, help, point, point way” VS talking about politics, speaking at a conference…), extra time spent on English outside school (watching English TV, discussing in English here, learning at an academy, traveling abroad, home teacher, etc). Usually the wealthier you are, the more options you get to learn English very well (a rich guy in Japan could easily send their children to an American school, even in the USA). With Esperanto those differences (inequalities) would almost disappear: I’ve seen a lot of common people who learned fluent Esperanto just at home through internet, and old book, etc.

      Native speakers can speak English in a couple of years like you started doing when you were two, but oc course I meant studied English, foreign English at school: A foreigner who does not live in an English speaking country, so not surrounded by a high/native level English almost 16 hours every day (24h-8 sleeping hours). This link is very interesting: Mean years of English shcooling in Sweden VS in Japan (almost 12 years both of them), but the results are very different for hard working Japanese speakers http://www.ef.se/epi/compare/regions/se/jp/

      “it strikes me as odd that it should take so long to learn English in a school environment.” Well, I wonder why Swedish people continue needing so much time at school… maybe they just keep on teaching 12 years to get almost native, in this competitive world you are never satisfied with your English level, if you are able, you’ll always want more to have better assets than another candidate for the same job, although sometimes companies/schools are just looking for English natives (the really good people in English) and you’ll be left out anyway (even if you speak another language or you’ve learned other important skills for that job).

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Alex, a dimmed light bulb would have begun to not work correctly. And the schools I attended and companies I have worked for have never replaced a light until it wasn’t working. Even if a brighter better one is purchased they still squeeze every ounce of life out the old one first. So, is your assumption/opinion that English has stopped functioning as a language? Also, apart from ease of learning (which could be a result of it being unused and therefore incomplete, I guess it’s had to borrow words such as rocket from other languages. How would it continue to form new words when the sources languages are gone?) can you site any advantages of Esperanto that would make it beneficial? L.e.d. Light bulbs are in fact cheaper to run, better for the environment during production, better for the environment during use and better for the environment at end of life cycle. Multiple reasons to switch. Can you think of more reasons for Esperanto? Fairness in business deals will not be an idea businesses will get on board with. Especially those businesses who already have the upper hand and therefore get most sway over such matters (I have a comical image in my head of a business deal in English to discuss the change to Esperanto. The top company have the worlds best English linguist and want to keep that advantage).

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      I think my analogy wasn’t as good as expected :P

      What i meant to say is people/companies change their common/main language according to the currently brighter language. If another language becomes more benefitial (mainly because it gets wider and bigger than the adopted one) people/companies change their language (just like a once brightest French replaced by the currently brigtest English).

      So i compared ethnic languages used as international languages as a light bulb that finally gets dimmer than another one (some current light bulbs are replaced the moment they get to dim, or they simply stop working). English, French, etc works perfectly (inside their borders) and till now we’ve been using the brightest language of the moment, that finally is replaced (or dies) in the international field as the main one. And I tried to show Esperanto as sth different, in a higher level for the international communication field (it just needs more speakers, with or without countries/institutions backing it around the world, such as Unesco did).

      Esperanto’s learning easiness is a result of being a planned language for that easiness purpose (because of its bridge purpose). Its community, supervised by an Esperanto academy, creates new words from existing ones or borrowed words (if borrowed, the language root vocab gets larger, and therefore less easy to learn) pretty similar to any other language. More details here http://linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/4009/is-esperanto-accepting-new-root-words
      As Chinese when it entered UN, would Esperanto be adopted by the EU, there should be some kind of team to create glossaries and I bet some new roots, supervised by the academy. The name for rocket is raketo, but if you don’t know a term (and it won’t be written on a EU paper or sth serious) you can make it up (if there’s a context it would work, no one would tell you can’t say that, etc)… for example: bombolanĉilo (bomb launcher) or spaclanĉilo (space launcher).

      Apart from easiness and other features (as fairness, one of the policies to protect minority languages, etc) that most companies currently aren’t interested in (because they ignored it and/or just follow trends and like wasting resources together in the long term), the main reason for companies would be the moment Esperanto gets bigger/brighter than the ethnic language being used by companies. It would naturally replace those languages for international purposes, because Esperanto would give them better results within the company (and on the markets), just as any ethnic language did before (that would be that hypothetical future if you can’t think of companies changing their actual trends to decide which language to use).

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Alex, thank you for the informative reply. But it does sound like you must now concede that global cooperation would be required for the language to take off. (since business won’t push for it, the best hope is that schools across the globe begin teaching it, and what would be the chances that they’d all do that coincidentally?). I wasn’t aware Esperanto had a comity dedicated to it’s continued evolution. I take it that it has the support of a fairly rich (or group of rich) patron(s) then?

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      You are welcome, thank you for this pleasant discussion, very seldom i have the opportunity to converse in this level ;)

      I don’t think we need any global cooperation, but i think it would very convenient and easier to happen in that possible world. A EU adopting Esperanto would make a lot of people learning Esperanto around the world, not just in the EU, and just because of that growing number, and maybe let’s also add the facts a big institution like the EU officially adopted it (it breaks the ice, it is no longer crazy) and more experiments showing Esperanto learned first makes you learn English faster, etc… For those reasons (or just the first one if higher than the English figure) other schools outside the world would teach it, just because people who learn it get more benefits for less cost than (just?) learning English.

      Do you see any global cooperation worldwide for English teaching? maybe just some kind of cooperation with the British Council or Education First. You can see you don’t need to make countries cooperate to teach sth worldwide (it might seem they are cooperating). And i said it would be easier to get a global cooperation in the Esperanto case since Unesco already called the UNO state members to consider the language problem and Esperanto in schools and educational institutions.

      Resolution of 1985: “Invites the Member States to mark the centenary of Esperanto by suitable arrangements, declarations, issuing of special postal stamps, etc.,

      and to promote the introduction of a study programme on the language problem and Esperanto in their schools and higher educational institutions ;”

      About the Esperanto Academy.. I think it doesn’t need too much money to work. “The finance is covered by a subsidy from the World Esperanto Association and by donations.” source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akademio_de_Esperanto

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Alex, I’m sorry to say I must disagree with you there. Cooperation in teaching English didn’t need to exist for the sole reason that the demand for teaching English demanded supply. The cooperation came when the world began to stop using French for business and started to use English, when the N.A.T.O. Alliance was formed on the backbone of USA. And when the world decided Hollywood films and English spoken music were welcome within their culture. And albeit from a less mutual cooperation level, from when the British Empire could claim territories on every continent except antartica and the local/indigenous people learned English either through migration and inevitable mingling of populace or from a desire to communicate with their colonial power. There were/are a long list of reasons for demand to learn the language, and like a snow ball rolling down a hill, the more people spoke it globally, the more people wanted/required to learn it. Esperanto has a major disadvantage in being a language native to nobody, it’s a single snowflake right now. Short of the EU adopting it (global cooperation right there to get all member states to agree to that) as the official EU language and scrapping their mother tongues into the bargain (the only way the outside world wouldn’t just keep using English, Spanish, French etc. to talk to them) then I cannot foresee this snowflake becoming popularised. When I picked languages at school I chose them so I could converse with other peoples, I wasn’t going to pick a language nobody else spoke!

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      @Duncan, your last reply makes me think you had a bad day, your computer was hacked or you didn’t think enough this time. I don’t see you hold the discussion level as high as usual (or maybe I got wrong impressions because there’s no emojis, voice, etc). I replied with a long comment but somehow moderator (or some kind of automatic moderator) didn’t accept it (and fek! I didn’t backup save that reply)

      so shorter answer (now backup): you didn’t read well, i think, I never said English needed a global vooperation to get where it is now, so till “wanted/required to learn it” i agree with you.

      “Esperanto has a major disadvantage in being a language native to nobody”
      Esperanto natives exists, although their level is like mine and anyone who reached fluency. Video esperanto like a native https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzDS2WyemBI

      “it’s a single snowflake right now.” I agree. Compared to big languages it is. Compare to Icelandic and other known languages it is a snowball, it it is getting snowflakes from all around the globe, lately many English speakers. Like many of those 400.000 new learners on Duolingo this year https://www.duolingo.com/course/eo/en and 2 million every year by 2020 I foresee… so for Esperanto one day we might say “There were/are a long list of reasons for demand to learn the language, and like a snow ball rolling down a hill, the more people spoke it globally, the more people wanted/required to learn”

      This is what most surprised me… quite a childish argument if you meant saying “nobody speaks Esperanto” “Esperanto is a snowflake”
      “When I picked languages at school I chose them so I could converse with other peoples, I wasn’t going to pick a language nobody else spoke!”
      I suppose you live in the UK, that time maybe English was not as important as now (maybe French) and you didn’t really “choose”, you had a limited range of options, based on what was most important in your time for your school. You would have never chosen Esperanto or Chinese because you didn’t have that option (as many children don’t really have the option choosing a funny Esperanto, or a hard English they could learn much better after having learned Esperanto and confirming they can really learn languages and they are no idiots without talent). Now maybe your former school can teach Chinese, an maybe now for less years because their pupils were born with a huge privilege (English as a mother tongue and the lingua franca) so they don’t need to learn languages and struggle like an Estonian, Mongolian, etc would try for 10 years and a lot of money spent on that.

      I can tell you you just didn’t know anyone around you that spoke Esperanto… By 1960 one million people signed a proposal at UN about making Esperanto accepted etc. And 60 million represented people (ngo’s signing it) backed all that. It was refused by UN: it was not a proposal from a state member, but from an organization

      So… to a frog living in a well the well is the entire universe (6 years ago i was in a well, not knowing of alternatives such as auxlangs and Esperanto and just blindly supporting English, as many other frogs is the well I left behind)

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Alex, I must admit I have bad days and good days like everyone else. But I think my reply was accurate if possibly too poetic in nature (analogies as a form of description may be adding a level to the discussion that is counterproductive) when I said I chose languages at school, I was indeed limited on options, my options were French and German. I selected both, because I wished to be able to converse with other peoples. If my options had been Klingon, French, German and Esperanto I would have still only selected French and German. When I say nobody speaks Esperanto, I am perhaps a victim of national statistic figures (I did not mean to say nobody has ever learned to speak the language, I would have also Sai nobody speaks Klingon or Latin) when you look in an atlas, some of the better ones include figures like language of the countries, religious proportions etc. Esperanto did not/does not appear on any country as a spoken language for that country. At 16 when my language skills were still fresh in my memory and sharp from use I knew I could travel to France and Germany and be able to talk to the locals, maybe not about politics or engineering but I could find a pub, order a round of drinks and ask a theoretical pretty barmaid or waitress to come to bed with me and so on. Esperanto would not have given me any confidence in being able to do the same in either country or any other country. I can see that may well potentially change in the future, and frankly given the social changes in my community over the passed years Polish would have been a more advantageous language to have learned. But I was not given that option at school and so am now picking it up as a spoken language, and only piecemeal, I’ll never become fluent at this speed of learning but it’s better to try than to not bother at all. I have the good fortune to include a Cantonese speaker amongst my closest of friends and so again I have been given a few words I can pronounce with a degree of success. My point I guess is that I was more able to learn a language in a school environment (forming of sentences, use of connecting words etc.) than I am through occasional real life interaction which allows me please and thank you and similar (sadly more swearing than I am likely to use is included in my vocabularies) and also that nobody I have met face to face has ever attempted or asked to communicate with me in Esperanto.
      I am open to the possibility of this changing in the future, I am in no way trying to disagree with the merits of it as you have stated them. But the one thing I keep circling back to is that currently, and as the world situation is for me personally, and from the perspective of the world at large as I am able to perceive it there is insufficient reason to validate learning Esperanto AT PRESENT.
      It may (or may not) be in the interests of the international community to change this for the future. But I doubt that realistically will be implementable completely within my lifetime even if work began towards that goal by tomorrow.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      @Duncan, i suppose if your options would have been Klingon (artlang), French, German and Esperanto (auxlang) you would have probably considered getting some info about Klingon and Esperanto (btw did you know that word “Esperanto” when you were 16? Were you naturally curious?) and like many people who learned Esperanto (mainly when they were 15-20) you would have still selected French, German but maybe also Esperanto for different practical reasons you would then know (and maybe Klingon just for some fun), like the one that Esperanto would improve your French/German level.

      Ok, if you think you are perhaps a victim of etc., then i ask you not saying nobody speaks x language just because that language has no country (or because compared to Y it’s really tiny). That is insulting, unfair, and inaccurate for speakers of that language. Most of the languages out there have no country for their own and even no script, they are sometimes just spoken in a small village.

      Yes, if you just wanted to talk with any local that could speak French/German and not Esperanto, Esperanto would have been useless for those purposes, and then and currently that is only natural.

      Congrats for all that language learning, try checking polyglot’s websites such as
      http://www.fluentin3months.com/polish to get further from hi and bye.

      That is something many Esperanto speakers like me should change when going abroad (to spread it and create a demand). From this summer on I will always ask abroad, at tourist info or hotels for someone who could communicate with me in Esperanto, and if not, then i’ll ask for Spanish speakers, then English, French etc. Many of us usually don’t even bother asking for info in Esperanto (like me till this summer) because we usually know many languages (also the most usually learned… English) so we like to improve those difficult languages and don’t want to ask for a language that is not as commonly learned as English etc. People who asked for info in Esperanto from time to time get lucky, and if not, at least more people get to know of the existence of Esperanto and the fact “there are people who do speak Esperanto” because hey, i’ve met one!

      Yes, i agree with your last point. Fortunately nobody knows what the future holds. I hope i can see that change in my lifetime and if not i’ll struggle to make it easier for next generations ;)

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Alex, yes, you are right. It was wrong of me to generalise, although I have to say it would be difficult for me to not do so at the age I was making my language selections, having at that point never left the UK. I had not heard of Esperanto when I was younger, and I was (and still am) very inquisitive in nature. However since my being educated preceded the vast expansion of the world wide web, researching into what Esperanto is would have been far more difficult an exercise and would almost certainly not produced up to date accurate information or somebody championing it’s cause such as yourself, so I really think my statement of I would still have picked French and German to be accurate.
      I think what you are proposing to do with regards asking for Esperanto communications would be a positive way to promote something you care about, best of luck with it. :)

    • avatar
      D

      Why should English or any other language for that matter replace Maltese?! All EU citizens have the right to have their language recognised by the Union and Maltese should not be treated any different.

  78. avatar
    Luís Almeida

    I believe it should. Several languages such as Portuguese, French and English can’t be considered as owned by the countries they originated from because they became universal. English is a universal language not because it came from England, but because it’s widely spoken all over the world, particularly in important countries for the EU, such as Australia, Canada and the USA. Removing English is an emotional reaction to the Brexit and a very troublesome one. We should definitely know better and think reasonably.

  79. avatar
    José Ferreira da Silva

    English is a synthetic language, with a relatively easy grammar, and consequently it is easy and quick to learn by a non-English speaking person. So, English is in practice an international language, and therefore it should remain the EU de facto official language.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      The first sentence did never caused the second sentence… you are mixing relative easiness of English (maybe for you, not for a Chinese) with current state of English due to a former empire and a mighty USA. You also forget that status will change one day as history shows when they are just forced onto people because of economical/cultural/military temporary supremacy. You forgot people need more than 10 years (is that really easy and quick? learn just one lesson in Esperanto and compare) at school to learn English just quite well (in here in Spain or even in China people can barely speak it. In Spain just 22% can hold a conversation), and you forget all they/we won’t ever master: idioms, slang, many culture references, many accents, phrasal verbs, pronunciation, spelling, therefore you have spelling bees in English or The Chaos poem a native couldn’t even pronounce correctly)

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu FB
      The Spanish Prime Minister Rajoy has pushed through a law requiring English language films to be sub-titled rather than dubbed as he has realised that the poor command of English by native Spaniards has contributed towards its backward economy.

      He only reinforces the ‘Sapir-Whorf’ hypothesis!

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Alex, idioms and slang are not exclusive to the UK (and even differ across the UK in many cases) yet it is still easier for two people sharing even a second language in common to communicate than it would be for two people to speak to each other with one speaking, lets say Spanish and the other for example speaking in Russian. At that stage you only really have body language and inflection/tone to work with. You’d still have those if neither party was fluent in the common second language. Also, I don’t think the suggestions was should English be used as the only language in the EU. But I agree with your sentiment. Second languages are not easy for everyone. I would realm struggle to understand somebody speaking French or German at me (especially if they didn’t speak clearly and concisely) since it’s been so long since I’ve used either. But when I chose to study languages it was a different world and a very different EU.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Tarquin, do you have a link to that piece of news? (because in English, you can’t say “that new”). I couldn’t find any news about that law :/

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Duncan, I agree pretty much with everything you said… but i’ll point out:

      I think I’ve never said idioms/slang are exclusive to the UK. In fact, they are very present in [almost?] every ethnic language, and even in Esperanto you have some translated idioms the majority don’t use or would explain if said and not understood, and a kind of slang just for some literature books (both original and translated)

      Yes, it’s easier for a Spaniard to talk with a Russian in a learned common language, let’s say English (the most common), even if both have a low level.
      BUT… it is not easier if you speak to someone with a close language to yours, even if they have a high level in English (but they easily learned to understand small differences) you can often see this preferences: Swedish, Norwegians and Danish conversing in their languages, or Ukrainians with Russians, etc, or Spanish speakers with Catalan/Portuguese/Italian speakers (we just slow down if we are not used to, we use synonyms, some body language maybe…).

      “I don’t think the suggestions was should English be used as the only language in the EU”, well, he didn’t just suggest to make it official again, but he said “it should remain the EU de facto official language”. So he didn’t say “the only” and I didn’t say he told that. Nevertheless, you should know many of us have been notified about this new “debate” from this link where that kind of arguments (often fallacies ad hominem, populum, etc) where always repeated (by different or same people) and too many people agreeing making English the only official language (just because it is currently the de facto one, so no more reasons needed for them) https://www.debatingeurope.eu/2014/12/09/should-english-be-the-only-official-language-of-the-eu

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      And yes, Duncan, you are right, “Second languages are not easy for everyone”.
      I would even say “for anyone”. In order to master a second language (if not native in both) you need constant motivation and an entire life, because even in your native language you can’t know 100% of it (its culture, idioms, slang, all words, depending on you language all spelling, etc.).

      Even a language like Esperanto can’t be entirely learned (there’s always something you can learn, eg the name of a weird bird you didn’t know about, even in you native language), although the difference (with ethnic languages) is the faster learning curve to get a fluent or literature level (6 times faster for fluency, 10 times for reading and writing books, and as 1:1 to reach the unreachable perfection).

      In Esperanto all people have to do that extra effort to learn it good enough (not more than 150 hours for European language speakers, not more than 250 for Chinese speakers [compare 2500 hours difference in English between a Chinese and an English native with 0 extra effort]). And we all have to adapt our speech to our listeners: explain any cultural point (speaking with an English native in English you are often supposed to know its culture), explain any unfrequent root (if you feel/think you should), spelling a name/place not “esperantized”, be open to different points of view/cultural backgrounds/customs, etc… you can discuss about or even tell you feel uncomfortable with (please, don’t kiss me, let’s just shake hands), etc

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Alex, you indeed did not mention slang and idioms being exclusive to English. But you did mention slang and idioms as a possible difficulty in the use of second language status English, I feel it was poignant to highlight that the same difficulty will exist in any second language (and also regionally in the same language) in the interest of balance. Additionally, as a counterpoint to your neighbouring languages statement (your examples I know were Russian-Ukrainian, Spanish-Catalonian) that isn’t always the case. My neighbouring languages are Gaelic and Welsh. I’d stand more chance with the Spanish than with those. :)

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu FB
      Use Google!

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      ok :) I didn’t know you wanted to highlight that fact for that reason.
      And sorry, saying “neighbouring languages” i meant mostly the languages that are more closely related (in linguistics), not from a physical/geographical point of view (although they are both usually related).
      What I said wouldn’t be possible for a Spanish speaking to a Romanian or to a French (they are too different), or Gaelic and Welsh for an English speaker (as you said).

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      @Tarqin
      Ok, so first it’s not a law. I’ve almost found no news in Spanish about that http://cadenaser.com/ser/2010/10/07/cultura/1286407031_850215.html but i see that party suggests forcing children to have a minimum of tv only in English (children/parents could already change the audio to the original one and turn subtitles on, but it might seem better to force a language onto children, not giving them any freedom anymore… Nice suggetion :/ ). Your article is just wrong… Maybe it’s a way to make some British happier and prouder of their language, but everything has been exaggerated there and you’ve been mislead to think there’s even a law

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu FB
      The very fact that Rajoy entertained such a thought is proof of the importance of English dear chap/chapess.

      As regards your layman’s psychology – try re-reading my previous posts about me learning Spanish…

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Tarquin, did i ever say English is not currently important? Why do you want me to reread the fact you are learning Spanish? I just pointed out that what you think was a law is not and your source was exaggerated

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu FB
      …and I just pointed out that your psychological skills are a tad naff.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      @Tarquin… Whatever, if you need to talk about me and judge my skills because you started replying with a wrong source and based on that you mentioned the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis… I’ll better ignore you from now on. It seems to me you are often trolling around http://pluperfecter.blogspot.com.es/2011/08/14-characteristics-of-classic-internet.html?m=1

      your wrong reply saying the obvious “English is important in Spain too” isn’t relevant in this discussion… I hope you can understand my decision to ignore you, i’ll understand your decision to support English (but i won’t share it)

    • avatar
      EU citizen

      Hi Alex,
      I just wanted to say that I love the Spanish language and I have used it to converse with other people where we didn’t have any other common language and I have even made lasting friendships this way. The English language is very simple in terms of grammar. I have done German, French, Spanish, Bulgarian, Russian, a bit of Italian and obviously English. The verbal conjugation in all tenses is so much simpler, not to mention the lack of gender etc. I don’t think ppl learn English because of its richness but because it is so simple (grammar-wise).

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      @EU citizen I am sorry but i don’t agree. People learn English just because it is currently the mightiest language (the language from the world masters). If people would learn according to easiness, they would have chosen Esperanto long ago. English grammar, compared to Spanish is very easy, compared to Chinese/Esperanto it is difficult for the average worle citizen. You can learn English for more ten years and you will keep on making lots pronunciation/spelling mistakes (way less with Spanish and nothing with Esperanto), you won’t be able to understand/use all idioms or nonsense (most of them) phrasal verbs. If you think you know English well, even if you are a native, try this poem https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1edPxKqiptw

      No language till now has been learned as a massive international language for its easiness… Just for the power behind them and therefore the benefits getting closer to that power

    • avatar
      David

      I still find English easy on an entry level. Although I understand why one may find English pronunciation tough I still think the language is pretty easy. For instance “Give me” , “I am telling you to give me” and “I give you” is all the same give give give. Now I found learning Spanish harder with Dame, yo te digo que me des and yo te doy… (sorry if i ve made a mistake which will prove my point lol). In my everyday life I rarely come across an English idiom I dont understand.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Hi David! Where are you from?
      Yes, a lot of ethnic languages have difficult parts and not so difficult parts. I could say a beginner in Spanish will be able to pronounce/read it very well but will have a hard time with a good grammar for verbs (the gender in Spanish is very regular), and the opposite with English. Notice that “easiness” makes English translation (for apps, programs) difficult. Translators like me need to test the translation because we usually have no context: test (a test?, test!, adjective?).
      If English were easy we wouldn’t need to go abroad to learn it much better, spend 10 years at school and thousand of hours learning/practicing it to get fluent… That waste wouldn’t be possible with a auxlang like Esperanto, said to be 10 times easier than ethnic languages for a tourist level, and 6 for reaching fluency (my own experience with language learning confirms these estimations are quite right)

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu FB
      BTW I can understand why YOU understand why I would like English to be the EU supranational language but I cannot clearly understand (because it is illogical and idiotic to hold such an opinion) your desire to want Spanish to be the supranational language of the EU.

      PS: I am glad you have elected to ignore me. ;)

    • avatar
      Tomas Schimmer

      Tarquin… I don’t see he is supporting Spanish, he is supporting Esperanto, and that’s not an idiotic opinion at all. I can see he knows this whole topic well, and you are messing around like a kid. Bye.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Tomas Himmler
      Bye?
      I never even got the chance to say hello!

  80. avatar
    Flo Maes

    David Bellos : “Is That a Fish in Your Ear? The Amazing Adventure of Translation” :
    “The reasons why English has made a clean sweep of the sciences are not straightforward. Among them we cannot possibly include the unfortunate but widespread idea that English is simpler than other languages. However, you can’t explain the history and present state of the language of science as the direct result of economic and military might either. In three instances, languages became science vehicles because the work of a single individual made advances that could not be ignored anywhere else in the world (Liebig for German, Berzelius for Swedish, Mendeleev for Russian). One language lost its role because of the political folly of its users (German). What we seem to have experienced is not a process of language-imposition, but of language-elimination, in a context where the scientific community needs a means of global communication among its members. The survivor language, English, is not necessarily the best suited to the job: it’s just that nothing has yet happened to knock it out”

    • avatar
      Duncan

      So, are you inferring or forgetting that those German speaking scientists of the 1940’s ended up living in an English speaking country?

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Wise words. I agree with that, although I believe the economic and military might did also contribute to that, at least to make English a big language from an Empire (the English one), so lots of native speakers, with a lot of funds for science in English (The English countries are the wealthiest in absolute terms), so lot of scientists learn English and go there to research (because in their country, eg. Spain, we don’t have/invest that much in science). And the fact English native scientists do not need to spend up to 2000 hours to learn a foreign language to a science comprehension level makes the gap bigger, they can invest that time learning about their field or working there.

      So let’s say Iceland has speakers that proportionally make a lot more individual advances than the English speaking countries. Even if they published everything in Icelandic, their contribution compared to the English countries would be pathetic (because they don’t have a big language/country, so they can’t have as many advances as the USA). And in real life we know Icelanders usually speak English very well (compared to speakers from big languages or too different languages) and would write their science in English.

      If China keeps on growing, getting wealthier and more scientific… Chinese will knock English out or we will have two science languages (unless we agree using an auxlang like Esperanto). Till now, China still has a 1:1 ratio for science articles published there https://www.researchtrends.com/issue-31-november-2012/the-language-of-future-scientific-communication/

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu FB
      “English Empire”?

      Don’t you mean “British Empire”!

    • avatar
      Andrea

      Couldn’t guess. Why?

  81. avatar
    Spaniardfbm

    Will English remain the “de facto” EU official language?
    “De facto” is the opposite from “official”, so the question is meaningless.
    Will English remain as an EU working language?
    It depends of the member states’ governments. And it will be a tough fight, because the exams to become an EU public servant or contractor are made in the working languajes, mostly or completely. So it gives an (unfair) advantage to some nationalities.
    From that point of view, it would be wise to transform English, now, in the only working languaje, because that would favour only to irelands and maltesse. But that is highly unlikely.
    Will it remain as an EU official languaje? It depends of Ireland and Malta.
    Will it remain as the the facto lingua franca? I think it will, although if it looses it’s status as an EU working languaje, this would be a hard hit.

  82. avatar
    Lauri Johnson

    English in the No. 1 language in tourism and in business. Simply in coming together. Why should it not be in the EU. French has nothing much to come up with.

  83. avatar
    John de Wit

    De taal die momenteel het meest gesproken wordt in de EU is Duits. Dat moet dus de basistaal zijn, zolang men er niet wil voor kiezen om één (fictieve) taal (esperanto) als tweede (en later als eerste) taal te promoten. Engels kan het zeker niet meer blijven.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @John De Wit
      A less than witty post dear chap…

  84. avatar
    Mark Lock

    Change it to Spanish, German or French, but don’t worry as EU citizens you’ll voice won’t be heard and they’ll decide on whatever language they want to use whether you like it or not.

  85. avatar
    Antonio Lobo Fontelles

    English forever: it is democratic (everybody’s second language), it is practical and non-nonsense oriented and most of all IT HAS NO ACCENTS! :-)

    • avatar
      Duncan

      You’ve clearly never been to Newcastle! :)

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Sorry, that made me laugh :D
      “English forever: : it is democratic (everybody’s second language)”
      Really?! Have you forgotten all natives that would remain in the EU + the specific benefit English countries+culture English brings along?
      Practical: yes, it is currently practical, but also very inefficient (10 years?!) compared to a better alternative like Esperanto
      non-nonsense oriented: well… in my opinion it’s a nonsense shifting from lingua franca to lingua franca just because of which country is the mightiest on the world (Greek > Latin > French > English > Chinese > ?)

      “and most of all IT HAS NO ACCENTS!!”
      is that really a good reason? that is a little good feature just when typing in English (saving some seconds) but i wouldn’t yell it as an advantage.
      English: “40+ phonemes of the spoken language with an alphabet composed of only 26 letters (and no diacritics).”
      Conclusion… you need more than 10 years to speak it quite good… and way worse than English native speakers, you L2 speakers can’t pronounce this poem correctly https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1edPxKqiptw

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Alex Escomu FB
      Esperanto!?!?!?!?

      LOL!

      More like EFFperanto!

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Eugen Fabian
      Are you Worf or Davros?

  86. avatar
    Domenico Galardo

    EU burocrats are crazy and idiots. Why they should wipe out the most common spoke language ? They wanna wipe out english lang from the continent for not clear reason and then talk about racism ? They are racist and dangerous. Scrap EU, leave the market.

    • avatar
      Spaniardfbm

      The EU was born as a ser of institutions to promote Free market, so most of the eurocrats (at least, the ones that have access through public competitions) are pro market, and then pro english.
      But from the late 1990s and, specially, from 2003/2004, the national governments are designing the EU Commission bosses, or increasing the power of the Council. And that leads the EU to chaos and, definitively, far from what fairness, Free Market, and Justice, means.

    • avatar
      Duncan

      I think you folks are way off topic here.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Spaniardfbm
      The EU’s free market credentials are risible, look at the CFP or the CFF for proof or indeed the fact that there is no free or single market in the EU for financial services.

  87. avatar
    Rui Rodrigues

    Formally, this is no issue – all EU documents and parliament acts are done in all languages. The issue comes up in direct communication. English is the language everyone knows (in great part because its so basic). But French was the diplomatic language for centuries, they may want to cease the moment, although realistically, they don’t have a chance. The only consolation to those Europeans upset with brexit, is that the English language spread happens because of the US, not really the UK…

    • avatar
      Yasmine

      I can only disagree, Rui. English has spread far and wide due to the British Empire and, actually, isn’t this how it got to the US?

    • avatar
      David

      I think it is quite basic compared to other EU languages thats why it us used so much. Otherwise it could have been French or Spanish. Actually Spanish is spoken by more people than English and at some point French was was used the way English is used now. The wide spread of English in Europe is a recent thing.

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Rui Rodrigues
      English has a greater vocabulary than any Latin language, it is only considered basic for those who only have a basic understanding of English.

      As regards your last sentence, it sounds a bit RACIST and ANTI-DEMOCRATIC to me!

    • avatar
      EU citizen

      Well said David!

  88. avatar
    Palefire

    Enough of this Anglo Saxon logic,it is time for some norman wisdom!

    • avatar
      Paul X

      Ooo…..Mr Grimsdale!

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Paul X
      Brilliant, absolutely brilliant!

  89. avatar
    Lynda Germon

    It makes sense to keep English, because it’s a second language to most people !!! It has nothing to do with Great Britain !!!!!

    • avatar
      Tarquin Farquhar

      @Lynda Germon
      Erm, there would be no English language without GB.

      What is your point please?

  90. avatar
    Yasmine

    Yes, it will. German grammar is too complicated, as is French pronunciation…

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Well, you think it will, I hope it won’t (and first, it should enter again as an official language).
      The reasons for you hopes shouldn’t be just based on difficulty in German or French mainly because English isn’t easy either (you have spelling bees for native adults! that is impossible in Spanish or Esperanto, and it would be quite stupid in German), for example it has a terrible pronunciation/spelling (I would say read pronunciation is more erratic/irregular than the French one).

      If you think you English is easy (even as a native) try the Chaos poem https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1edPxKqiptw

  91. avatar
    Bastian

    I think the arguments of Mrs. Hubner are reasonable.
    To keep English as lingua franka in EU institutions is simply a question of practicality. Due to historical reasons English became the main language in international relations of all kinds.

    However, as far as it concerns the broader population in continental Europe the use of English is quite diverse. For example, in Latin Europe to communicate successfully with English in an everyday situation is much less likely than in countries of the Germanic or Slavic language group.

    Another question is the competition between English and major national languages like French and German at home. Currently here an interesting dynamic can be observed.

    In the German speaking countries, for example, attempts are made due to globalisation to offer more and more academic programmes in English and thus diminish the relevance of German in higher education.
    On the other hand, the strong work migration from inside and outside the EU to these countries (D, A, CH) makes German a more important language in Europe simply because most of the migrants do not move into positions where English is demanded (or even sufficient) and, of course, German is vital for mastering situations of everydays life. This also holds true for the thousands of cross-border commuters from CEE/SEE. Hence, the numbers of German speaking people in Europe is increasing, although in academia and international companies German is under pressure even at home.

    By the way, other than Obama or Clinton, the Russian president Putin speaks perfect German -:).

    • avatar
      Duncan

      Can you find any supporting evidence with regards to Germanic & Slavic languages people having an easier time speaking English than Latin languages people? I’ve not particularly noticed this pattern in my day to day life, and would have though given the germanic-Latin joint lineage of English it would have been as easy for both language groups. But would be interested to find out my assumptions were wrong.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Duncan, I think i can give you an answer and statistically he is pretty right:

      Germanic languages are very close to English (for a Dutch or Swedish English is like Italian for a Spanish) and are usually minority languages (so they often watch a lot of original films/TV in English with cheap subtitles or read more books in English than in Danish [current fact for Danish people]) so they have more time spent to improve their English and stronger motivations as their language is quite useless outside (almost no one learn their language). The exception is Germany (there are lots of dubbed films/series and original productions)

      Slavic languages are usually minority languages (Russian is the big one) so they get TV/series subtitled, it’s the cheapest option (or voice-over “dubbed” in Polland, with a quite big language) and they also have a stronger motivation, as Scandinavians etc

      Latin languages are big (Spanish, French, 80M Italian), so they can afford (more) not learning English and paying for dubbing (there is also a strong dubbing tradition which grew stronger during dictatorships > censoring).

      So English is not as closed as for German/Dutch, etc, they don’t spend that much time learning it, they don’t have that much motivation, their teachers are usually not that good, etc. Here you can watch a fantastic video in French (with some subtitles) explaining “Do French people have a problem with English?” https://www.amara.org/en/videos/7TfzdoCesvBG/info/les-francais-ont-ils-un-probleme-avec-langlais-mltp9/

    • avatar
      Duncan

      @Alex, so the problem is cultural & political then, not difficulty with the phonics themselves?

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      If you think it’s a problem some speakers (with a nation that can recoup that translation/dubbing investment) usually prefer enjoying films/books, etc in their own language, then it’s a problem (but I don’t think so, it’s forcing them all learn English in their free or not free time)

      If you think it’s an actual politic problem, then it is (it is if your goal is forcing everyone to learn English. Goverments should make laws forbidding dubbing into big wealthy languages, and it would be better forbidding their languages too)

      No, phonics is a reason. A regular English spelling would make everything easier, even for Scandinavians. So the reason why a lot of learners around the globe can’t speak English isn’t just the difficulty with the phonics (a really difficult science in the chaotic English)

    • avatar
      Duncan

      I think you misunderstand me. I was asking if the problems people from Germanic/Slavic language backgrounds have more difficulty learning English than those from a Latin language background was based on cultural & political differences as opposed to the actual technical difficulties associated with learning English caused by differences in the mother language. I wasn’t implying I thought someone with cultural or political reasons to encounter English less frequently meant that was a problem in any other sense.

    • avatar
      Alex Escomu FB

      Yes, no problem. I was quite sure you didn’t really mean saying those countries had a problem (it’s just their language situation/context is different so they are less promt to learn it better than the others), that’s why I wrote those if if.
      I already saw you are able to put yourself in someone else’s shoes. I suppose you didn’t mean in your last comment saying “problems people from Germanic/Slavic” “than those from a Latin” but all the opposite, did you?
      The differences in the mother language are also crucial for language learning, a Spanish could learn Italian quite fast if you drop him in Italy or make him listen to Italian songs, etc frequently. The same happens with a Dutch and English language. A Chinese being dropped in Britain/Spain, etc would have a very hard time…

    • avatar
      Duncan

      I absolutely didn’t mean that it was a problem in any other context than what we were discussing. As for the Chinese speakers in England picking up English, I have encountered this in day to day life often. Some of my school friends were from Cantonese speaking Hong Kong and I would say they do struggle more with English (although mainly in terms of grammar and writing) than people I’ve met from Europe. It’s still easy enough to understand what they mean though, and they seem to have a better handle on the language than their parents. Also, it seems IQ and possibly gender may contribute to linguistic skills since it seems as though the women from other languaged countries proportionately speak better English, and the more intelligent people seem to be able to hold bigger vocabularies in a second language. Again, just based on my own experiences and might not be a true proportionate representation. Especially since the people I’ve met have all had a valid reason to learn English. Apart from on my travels abroad when I was younger but since I spoke their language I couldn’t speak for their skill in English.

  92. avatar
    Melanie

    Yes it’s diversità, and to Danuta Hübner I want to say thank you for bringing up the fact that English is an official language of Malta. By removing English as an official language, not only would you be ignoring two EU members, but you would also be greatly inconveniencing the EU, especially those of us who will be set apart due to their mother tongue. Without English as an official language, I would only be a native speaker of Maltese and therefore wouldn’t be totally proficient in any working languages. The UK doesn’t deserve special treatment, but please don’t ostracise Malta (and Ireland) in order to make your point.

  93. avatar
    Henrik

    Mrs Hübner is right : English is the official language in both Ireland and Malta, and will therefore continue to be an official EU language.
    For many years French was the most used language in the daily work in the EU institutions. Since the arrival of the ten new Member States in 2004 English has become the working language for many officials. This is a fact, and it has nothing to do with Brexit.

  94. avatar
    Robert

    It would be fantastic if EU , use one of a constructed languages for ex. Atlango and made it as our really European language. Our culture and our citizens would grow with this common language. What a beautiful adventure! Many jobs! An utopia? Just go for it EU !

  95. avatar
    Andrej Němec

    One of the official languages. There should be also on Slavic language and one Romance (French)

  96. avatar
    Goran Niksic

    YES! English unites the citizens of EU more than any other language. Even though it may no longer be the mother tongue of a large number of EU citizens, it is the most spoken foreign language with the largest degree of fluency.

  97. avatar
    Apostolos Pagkoutsos

    The EU official language should be elegant, expressive, precise and carry a lot of history. Therefore cannot be other than Italian.

  98. avatar
    Nando Aidos

    Dear politicians,
    English will be the ‘de facto’ language because it was already the ‘de facto’ language long before you, the politicians, woke up to the fact, shall I say, to the ‘de facto’.
    And not only in Europe but in the rest of the world too.
    Next question?

  99. avatar
    nando

    Dear politicians,
    English will be the ‘de facto’ language because it was already the ‘de facto’ language long before you, the politicians, woke up to the fact, shall I say, to the ‘de facto’.
    And not only in Europe but in the rest of the world.
    Next question?

  100. avatar
    leleu

    A E I O U
    Austriæ Est Imperare Orbi Universi

  101. avatar
    Richard Neither Molnar

    Yes. And thanks to the Brexit, English language will be neutral, so no French or German can complain about using English as a transfer language among EU nations.

  102. avatar
    René Aga

    YES!! But not because of the UK. It is also the language of the USA, Canada etc. It is a global language. But learn as much languages as possible.

    • avatar
      Boris

      Mistake ! CANADA has two official languages with equality of status : English and French! 25% of Canadians speak French at home!

  103. avatar
    Tobias Stricker

    for sure. No other language is spoken at the commission by all its staff, even if French pretend. The second largest language would be German and again not French!

  104. avatar
    Enric Mestres Girbal

    If the EU politicians had had some inteligence, they should have made ESPERANTO the oficial language, regardless of each country having its own..

  105. avatar
    Giorgos Tsolakis

    certainly Yes because most of the developed countries they are at the top in means of economy strength they have English as their official language

  106. avatar
    Dimitris Orfanoudis

    After English “” The Babel tower””” you could mix-up in a bowl all EU languages and start to used it like the Esperanto… hahahahahahah

  107. avatar
    João Roque

    I think It’s hard not to be, only if there was a gigantic push towards another language. If so, which language? German, french? Everyone would call that biased towards a specific country

  108. avatar
    Peter

    Ireland is not part of UK !!! Ireland is part of UE ignorant !!!! And we spoke English by the way !!! is so bad if you don’t have basic knowledge like that it is disqualification !!!!
    Have a good day !!!

  109. avatar
    Fernando Ferreira

    Simple. ESPERANTO! New generations studying a new language to be introduced in the system in X years to come.

  110. avatar
    Pedro Cav Cav

    Yes, after all the investment, that many countries made, of more than two decades on english language teaching, it would be really nonsense to throw it all away!

  111. avatar
    Marco Brigonzi

    Seriously? It’s a question that even a child would be ashamed of asking.
    “You stole my biscuit, we’re not friends anymore!” gne gne gne

  112. avatar
    Tchoum Xav

    De facto means it decides for itself… So the question is ‘self-combusting’ :-p

  113. avatar
    Daniela Hoxha

    English is a Managment language so…Don’t want EU to increase their profits anymore??? Then Greek is the most beautiful language!!!

  114. avatar
    Daniela Hoxha

    English is a Managment language so…Don’t want EU to increase their profits anymore??? Then Greek is the most beautiful language!!!

  115. avatar
    Carmen Rodikaa

    It should be kept as an ALTERNATIVE language, not an official one. Lazy guys who only learned English for convenience should start learning other languages

  116. avatar
    Konrad Kiljan

    Ever heard about Ireland? Besides being the only language that people in all European counties learn, it is also spoken by this very friendly, economically successful and pro-European nation. With all the potential costs of making a change now, I am surprised Debating Europe even asked such a question.

  117. avatar
    Takis Karpoutzoglou

    It must become “The” language of the EU. Think how rich it can become by incorporating the key words from all EU members dictionaries’, all the knowledge, the wisdom, the nuances.. It will become an unprecedented source of knowledge.

  118. avatar
    Alessandro Amato

    What do you think about the “Esperanto” language? Many people think that it could become the official language of the EU.

    • avatar
      Paul X

      You will find this has already been discussed at length earlier in this thread. At the end of the day even if the EU could stop the emotional bitching about language and adopt Esperanto the rest of the world certainly wont so it will be a step backwards as far as international business goes

    • avatar
      Paul X

      Why exactly is it fairer?, just because some European countries (e.g. France) jealously view the widespread use of English as some sort of status symbol for the UK?
      EU immaturity at it’s best…..

  119. avatar
    david1610

    Most of the posts here are political in nature, but it is important to look at the learning of foreign languages in schools in the EU. It is clear that English is the main foreign language learnt and if you organised a European meeting of teenagers for sport, or culture, or whatever, involving many nationalities, English would be the de facto language used for communication. Even if there was a common political will to change that language, imagine the investment required to train enough foreign language teachers of another language. It would take at least a decade.

  120. avatar
    leleu

    Ĉu vi scipovas la Angla kaj Esperanto? Nur por lerni la unua necesas dek jaroj. Por esperantigi iu instruisto de lingvo nur dek tagoj necesas.

  121. avatar
    Malik

    We need English for all eu country’s be cause English is most camuncation language of the world, so if we ll adopt English, it’s not for making happy to British or not, it’s only for us for our need , so we need English language for all eu countries or all countys of the world , that’s best for our for all country’s for best interest,

  122. avatar
    Boris

    In my opinion this is only a matter of choice and more specifically a matter of citizen choice. English has only recently become the leading language within EU institutions. Until approx. 2000, the main working language was French and Europe was not doing worse than in 2016! Before UK joined the EU in 1973 (at that time Ireland and Malta were not either EU members), English was already the world’s leading language (it had indeed replaced French in this role just after WW2) and had however no status within EU institutions as it was official language of no EU country. At the same time, all European countries used to have fully normal political or business relationships with USA and the rest of the world!!!! What EU is gonna do with languages in the future will reflect first of all its political options. Option 1 : we consider EU as a simple reflection of globalization ; in this option, lets maintain English as leading language within insitutions, although it does not reflect citizen’s reality. Option 2 : we want to build up EU as a specific economic, political and citizenship area that weighs as a whole within globalization (and participates in it, obviously). In option 2, choosing English would be senseless as native English speakers would be 11 million people among 450! As recent Brexit crisis at least in part results from the feeling of “Europe apart from citizens”, the least we can do is to think carefully about it. In EU parliament, we will anyway keep needing interpretors for ages, this is the sole assertion I am sure of.

    • avatar
      Henrik Jorgensen

      England, Ireland (and Denmark) joined the EC (now EU) in 1973, and English became an official EC language.
      Actually English and French are both used as working languages in EU institutions at about 50-50 %, or rather 40-40, because German and other languages are also used.
      It was never decided to use any language as the “official” language in the EU institutions, as far as I know. In 2004 ten East-European countries joined the EU, and English has been used more and more, because many of the staff coming from these countries speak English rather than French.
      Ireland and Malta use English as their official language; consequently, if England leave the EU English will still be one of the official languages.
      English is not, and has never been, the de facto official language. However, when dealing with the US, we speak English; when we deal with people from other countries English is often the “foreign language” both sides know best.

  123. avatar
    Boris

    It dépends ! All Arabic countries have Arabic as sole official language and more than a half use French as administrative and diplomatic language. Same thing for around 20 countries in Africa of which the sole official language is French. A few years ago, after the famous natural disaster in Haiti, the EU Commission had sent official messages to Haïti’s population and Haiti’s government in English, whereas this country exclusively uses French. This option was particularly heavy-handed as EU also has French as one of its official and working languages. In similar way and in my opinion, EU should address countries of South America in Spanish or Portuguese etc. EU means diversity and it should therefore not mean harmonization of Europe around the exclusive use of one language that represents nothing but a small minority of its own population.

  124. avatar
    Zoltan Kiss

    English is the de facto language of the whole world not only the EU. The fact that the UK leaves won’t change that.

  125. avatar
    Shahadat Bablu Hossain

    Where is the problems?, lots of English people’s doesn’t know how to speaks and write their own language!
    Rather than English is not only their language, it’s a language which are mixed up with many other language like rottkan, Moore,schachchen may many more

  126. avatar
    カメニャク マリオ

    I am not sure if we should still use English. There are some practical reasons to continue using it. But it would send a wrong message.

    Maybe if we can get Scotland out of the UK and back in the EU. Or it would be fun to separate London.

    However German is a good candidate to replace it as the de facto default. Many native speakers and many secondary speakers in central europe.

  127. avatar
    Marco Musazzi

    Let’s just be honest. Nobody in the world (except Britons) speak English because of the UK. Brexit won’t change much

  128. avatar
    Don Bates

    Il n’y a pas une langue “de facto” de Europe c’est mythe! Toutes les langues sont officiellement paraît.

  129. avatar
    Alin Marian

    It is a fact that English is used by most people traveling within EU. Using a different language (i.e. French), would mean that most people in EU should know it, which not the case obviously. So, being practical, English is the used language, like it or not.

  130. avatar
    Stefania Portici

    ma prima della UE come facevamo a parlarci ? Eppure i Paesi comunicavano lo stesso . Quando i coloni andavano a colonizzare , la prima cosa che insegnavano era la lingua . Siamo stati colonizzati ? Una lingua non può essere imposta e sopratutto l’inglese che non fa parte della nostra storia . Gli unici a capire quel che succede sono gli inglesi che stanno fuori e noi andiamo avanti a cenni a tastoni ? Con tutto quello che paghiamo alla UE possibile che non possiamo avere traduzioni delle leggi , dei discorsi e di tutto quello che succede ? Sembra sia fatto di proposito per non far comprendere , altro che integrazione ….puzza di ruberia

    but before the EU as we used to talk? Yet countries conveyed the same. When the settlers were going to colonize, the first thing they were taught the language. We were colonized? A language can not be imposed and especially English which is not part of our history. The only ones who understand what is going on are the Brits who are out and we go on to outline groping? With all that we pay to the EU possible that we can not have translations of laws, speeches and everything going? It seems to have done on purpose in order not to understand, but integration …. smells like robbery

  131. avatar
    Gönczi Attila

    Actually English is relatively easy to learn as it has a more simple grammar than French or German. Furthermore it is the lingua franca of the science and the economy all over the world. Of course if and when the latinos will become majority in the States we could debate once again about the issue. After that the Arabic will be the lingua franca of Europe. Btw: thanks for those who work hard for that.

  132. avatar
    Taki

    All languages had their time of influence due to political forces.
    Eg. …Chinese, Egyptian, Persian, Hellenic, Latin, French, English, Esperanto,… (and anything between/befor/after)

    Many unions have failed because they didn’t align the people with a neutral language, so resistance created antithesis that replaced the dominant language with the languages of their identity.

    Due to increased world entropy, internet is getting the critical mass & making the people think more.

    Esperanto is EGALITARIAN alternative to English (just 5% native + 5% pretending to know) & is rapidly taking over 1/3 of new learners (610,000 & exponentially growing) in very short time since Duolingo introduced just En>Eo course. Spanish Es>Eo is in beta & other languages would be coming.
    With the exponential increase & 10x faster learning time the # of speakers will dominate the other native languages in a decade (conservative).

    Chinese already use Esperanto for business with non english countries and with 10x faster learning it’s a matter of time when the BRICS will have an international communication language.

    Be ready.

    • avatar
      Steĉjo Schwichow

      Mi tute konsentas! Dankon.

    • avatar
      Steĉjo Schwichow

      Kompreneble!

  133. avatar
    Steĉjo Schwichow

    The Untied Kingdom has shown its contempt for the rest of Europe, why should the EU use its language? Let’s not forget that Irish and Maltese are official languages. I’d also suspect that Scot’s Gaelic will be at some point as well.

    This would be the most opportune time to consider Esperanto as a working language, if for no other reason than economics. Imagine having one Esperanto speaker from each native language translating from that language into Esperanto, then having it translated back to the other national languages. The EU would need far fewer translators.

  134. avatar
    Paul Vincent

    Probably… we don’t mind people making a complete pigs ear of it. ..whereas the French ….!!!!!

  135. avatar
    Svetoslav Todorov

    I’m more concerned with the de jure side of things. If it looses official status then we cannot expect to see official EU papers in it.

    • avatar
      Artis Lapsiņš

      It is de jure as its also the official language of Malta.

    • avatar
      Svetoslav Todorov

      That is correct, but as far as I know each country can designate one national language as official when dealing with the European institutions. Malta and Ireland chose Maltese and Irish respectively.

  136. avatar
    Ivan Burrows

    Of course it will, its taught in 99% of all Schools in the pointless EU. Why bother with inferior languages ?

    • avatar
      Liz Lyz

      Ivan, how long your mother tongue is Chinese, you are right. :) Stop to hidden yourself behind an UK citizenship, I think everyone knows here you are a Chinese woman paid to put EU against UK. Nihao ! :)

    • avatar
      Ivan Burrows

      Liz Lyz Thank you for using the only language worth knowing :) the rest of your post was just childish nonsense so was ignored.

    • avatar
      Ivan Burrows

      António Espadaneira Out of 195 countries in the world, 67 nations have English as the primary language of ‘official status’. Plus there are also 27 countries where English is spoken as a secondary ‘official’ language and most of the rest teach English routinely given a total of around 5 billion users worldwide then yes, all other languages (with the possible exception of Han & Mandarin Chinese) are ‘inferior’.

    • avatar
      Liz Lyz

      :) Ivan, I speaks three languages. For me the language is only a way to communicate, nothing else. One day I hope we’ll have only one in the world, doesn’t matter which, I don’t care.

    • avatar
      Ivan Burrows

      The only language you are proficient in comrade is ‘troll’.

    • avatar
      Kianglek Tan

      What an ill-conceived opinion

    • avatar
      Kianglek Tan

      What has led you to conclude that English has conditioned many to perceive the own languages as inferior?

      And where was this 99% figure derived from?

  137. avatar
    Valentins Edgars

    my first language (Latvian) has small amount of speakers, my second language (Russian) is not official in Europe, my third language (English) is not official language in Europe anymore. Perhaps, it is time to learn German or French, but it is not easy

  138. avatar
    Valentins Edgars

    my first language (Latvian) has small amount of speakers, my second language (Russian) is not official in Europe, my third language (English) is not official language in Europe anymore. Perhaps, it is time to learn German or French, but it is not easy

  139. avatar
    Anonymous

    my first language (Latvian) has small amount of speakers, my second language (Russian) is not official in Europe, my third language (English) is not official language in Europe anymore. Perhaps, it is time to learn German or French, but it is not easy

  140. avatar
    Anatilde Alves

    Why would it change? It’s official coz it’s the most spoken language, not because of having the UK as part of us.

  141. avatar
    Jerzy Zajączkowski

    Majority of the most important achievements is financed by the richest country, the US, and consequently they are published in English. Those who want to use it must know the language. Second, it is important to note that English is the modern and easiest language to learn. Third, the whole world uses this language.

  142. avatar
    Codrin Cernăuțianu

    I don’t see any reason why it would change !!! Especially since USA is still the main global power, including culturally.
    Plus in a globalised world you need a lingua franca and unless you’re willing to revive ancient Greek or Latin, English is the most popular choice.
    Also a wanna-be federation like the EU, needs also a lingua franca to facilitate the communication between 27-28 member states … and that language should be also popular in the rest of the world ! So we’re back to English, as the most easy choice.

  143. avatar
    Nandor Vass

    Of course it will! People will not magically learn another language just because Britain is leaving

  144. avatar
    Marnix Kappeyne

    Wether a country is in the EU shouldn’t matter, english is still the most commonly spoken language in Europe.
    We should get rid of the language = property of the country idea

  145. avatar
    Eleni Kapa

    English was a quiz I-official language of the EU, even before the accession on the UK, as the EU institutions, published their official documents (annual reports, press releases, etc) also in English.

  146. avatar
    Manuela Moura

    It is not a case of whether it is good or bad, it is simply a fact and non Brits/Americans no longer control it…We, the second language Englishspeakers e.g. Indians, Africans, etc are shaping English as a manner of healthy Communication…

  147. avatar
    Yannis Pantazis

    The Adoption of Hellenic as the official language of the European Union.(Le Monde-France)

    As citizens of the European Union, we understood what is described in the myth of the Tower of Babel.

    Especially now that Brexit’s “wilderness” brings to light – besides everything else – and the linguistic issue, raise the problem of conciliation both at the level of Brussels bureaucrats and in general at the level of communication between the peoples of Europe. Even informal, the English language had succeeded and had a great depth and was a “tool” that helped the EU to operate more generally. Three prominent French intellectuals:

    Pierre Berringer, Nice – publisher
    Yves Canier, Besancon – professor of classical literature
    Catherine Teuler, Paris – English teacher

    explain to us in the French newspaper Le Monde the reasons why the Hellenic language can become the official of Europe.

    I translated from the French text and I wish it will be understood by you. At the end I quote the link:

    “It is understood that Brexit was made for two main reasons. The first is that England has never felt a country belonging to Europe.

    The second is the lack of democracy that characterizes the functioning of the European institutions and which citizens have perceived and complained tirelessly and for a long time.

    Everyone understands that it is time to recover if we want to save a European building that is no longer a utopia, after 50 years of efforts and concrete agreements in many areas. Above all, it is certainly useful to work to create a truly democratic operation for the Union.

    But if we want to make a decisive step towards a Europe that has its own dynamics, it is necessary to cultivate for the European citizen a sense of “belonging” that will make Europe a nation (which does not necessarily eliminate the nations that they constitute it).

    The integration of the citizen into the European construction is, in our view, linked to a symbolic decision which, by affirming our capacity as a European mentality, leads to an awareness that preserves us from the excesses of the deadly values of the dominant culture.

    Therefore, we propose the adoption of Hellenic as the official language of the European Union.

    Surely, this proposal will surprise and sarcasm, but we urge the reader to accept to see beyond his initial reaction the deep truth contained in what is now a utopia. We all know that, regardless of its rapid scientific and philosophical achievements, the Hellenic spirit has been able to define the concepts of democracy and the measure that are the foundations of European culture

    • avatar
      Yannis Pantazis

      If we want to promote a new awareness of this heritage, we do not just do it, to worship a historical monument or, even less, to raise a eurocentric paranoia, but because it sounds healthy to us at this time of doubt, to revitalize mentality with values that give a central place to dialogue, to the critical spirit, to the sense of measure, or even to the management of strikes of fate with fraternity.

      Because Hellenic language, the source of life that gave us the lights, never ceased to feed through the ages the same spirit that we are moving when we discover in Hellas today. Are we sufficiently aware that the daily behavior of the Hellenes, charismatic of the foreign tourist, is simply a manifestation of this same spirit ?

      Have we realized sufficiently that Hellenic is a language whose words reflect semantic, emotional and musical, deep meaning, that is, the truth of things, which survived and was not forgotten on the way? Finally, are we fully aware that this heritage, spirit, and semantic repercussion of words are elements that are still present in one language alive?

      Better than any other language, Hellenic is the language of man in contact with the ecumenical (as well, Kostas Axelos had formulated it so well in an inspired text). However, it is only up to us (and the Hellenes) to rely on this language and to draw inspiration from the spirit that governs it. Let us realize that Hellas is the treasure we have, and it would be an indication of very poor management to abandon it to the current regime, a language spoken of by a few.

      From a practical point of view, the adoption of Hellenic as the official language of the European Union is not expected to encounter major obstacles, not only those of inexhaustible sarcasm. And precisely because of its “gravity”, Hellenic language could not be seen as an opponent of the major languages ​​of Europe, so that its adoption as an official language of the European Union would be more a symbolic event than a real political one stakes.

      Because the issue is not to impose a universal learning of the Hellenic language, but simply to acknowledge it – as a language that symbolizes the European spirit – the status of the official language of the Union.

      What I propose is a kind of magic that seems to us rather than crazy, and that can transform the citizen of every country into a real citizen of Europe. I really have the certainty that the Europeans would be flattered if they had in this way a tangible sense of belonging to a culture that fascinates them, while, through that symbolic accession, they could draw the hope and will for one A balanced Europe that will give priority to humanity and its completion. In conclusion, the final say about the possible resonance of Hellenic in the life of the Union is the people. If our reasoning is true, it will triumph, if not, the adoption of Hellenic as the official language of the European Union will remain a minimum tribute to the source of our culture.

      But can we let the magic work?

    • avatar
      Yannis Pantazis

      As citizens of the European Union, we understood what is described in the myth of the Tower of Babel with the term “sound” of unconsciousness … Especially now that Brexit’s “wilderness” brings to light – besides everything else – and the linguistic issue … raise the problem of conciliation both at the level of Brussels bureaucrats and in general at the level of communication between the peoples of Europe. Even informal, the English language had succeeded and had a great depth and was a “tool” that helped the EU to operate more generally.

      This is now a “meteor”, since it is unreasonable for the English-speaking partner to “leave” his own language to be the common language of the bureaucrats of the multilingual EU.

      It is not possible that the bulk of the language certificates of EU translators. to be given by some state outside of it.

      This is particularly the case now that the EU needs first priority. to resolve her linguistic issue and that is not simple. Its everyday needs will necessarily push it to choose, even for operational reasons, a supreme linguistic “tool” common to everybody … It is no different, and now after Brexit … and all that implies.


      In a world where communication technology has made it terribly small, the existence of so many languages ​​appears to be an inhibiting factor in the evolution and notorious competitiveness … if not a “derailment” of the whole of European unification.

      If one considers the costs of these parallel and many time-consuming and expensive translations of any” act “within the Union.

      We are talking about a cruel situation if one thinks that thousands of translators of dozens of languages ​​live and work in Brussels, which at the same time are struggling to show the peoples of Europe that they are now a single people.

      But how and with which criteria can the language be chosen, which will prevail in Europe?
      By the criteria of the power of that which prevails economically or in population?
      In this case and after the “deafening” Brexit, would Europeans accept the Germanism prevalent at the linguistic level?

      With the criteria of language quality? Who will accept to “retreat” to something so subjective? In the peculiar Europe, under the present conditions, there can be no agreement on the level of language with so many languages ​​of so many peoples. There must be a different view of the linguistic things, so there is even a chance of becoming a “miracle” and going back together for a mutually acceptable choice.

    • avatar
      Yannis Pantazis

      … The dozens of European languages, which seem to be “redundant” and at the same time “passionately” cultivated by their owners … Dozens of languages, which have “strange” relations between them, are to fall. What do we mean by “odd” relationships? …

      Does not it seem strange to someone, that some people learn so many foreign languages ​​in a very short time? Are they so smart and talented, or is there something else that is more about the languages ​​themselves and less about them?

      Why are these different languages, which many people know, specific and not all? Why, for example, those who are both English, Italian, Spanish, German, etc., are many, and there are not many who know Chinese, Japanese or Indian at the same time?

      Why are many “different” languages ​​always the same for the many and the other different are also always the same and concern the very few?

      … Why does someone learn a multitude of “foreign” languages, which are no longer economically financially and do not learn less foreign languages, which still have economic returns? …

      Is it because in fact the “foreign” languages ​​to which we refer are not as strange as some would like? Something “connects” European languages ​​to each other and that “something” makes them easy to learn for those who have some of their native language …

      Something “connects” these European languages ​​to each other and this can not be a coincidence … It is certainly not accidental, because language is an important “tool” of power and power never leaves its “tools” to luck.

      Therefore, we must assume that none of these “strange” things happened at random. Everything was done because of some choices made by the creators of what we know as the Western World.

      However, the Western World did not appear to be from magic or accidental circumstances … “It was built” from start to finish with a “plan”.

      From Caesar’s Rome, who invaded Galatia, to the Latin American “conquistadores” or the “New World Swimmer” pilgrims, all of them had a specific power center that led them …

      A single center , and which was Rome.

      However, in a paradoxical way, while Rome was and remains ONE and Unique, its fanatic “crusaders” occasionally appear Latin-speaking, Hispanic or English-speaking.

      How can this happen? Why did the fanatically Catholic Spain of the conquistadors not be Latin-speaking?

      At a time when the peoples of the West were not emancipated and there was absolutely no national conscience, why did the mighty Rome of the Latin-speaking Pontiffs not impose a common language in order to be able to talk to their faithful?

      Half of Spain, along with its population, was given a dowry to anyone whom the Pope suggested as a bridegroom and could not this Pope enforce the language in his “live”?

      Could Rome impose a cruel and inhuman way of life and could not impose a common language? Did He burn you in the fire if they did not accept the New Testament and did not teach you to read it?

      He could enforce the harsh “commandments” of God and could not impose His “Language” … supposing that this was the language that His Master “the Pope” talked?

    • avatar
      Yannis Pantazis

      Is not that strange? Was the Pope worshiped as a living and sure-footed representative of God, and the flock “under” could not understand what the “right” he was listening to?

      For centuries the Christians were sitting and listening to the Word of God in a language they did not understand.

      At the same time, commands and admonitions heard them in the language they understood.

      The “revolution” of religious reform had to take place, to hear the Word of God in a language they could understand. Therefore; … So, for some reason – which we must find – it was Rome’s choice not to have a common language in her flock.

      If, in other words, we suppose that the Pope – had a real relationship with God, it was his own choice not to teach the world the language of God …

      It was a papal choice that the peoples did not know the language of God, to know only the language of the local “bilingual” Cardinals …

      … A language that the Master knew, of course, and those who were considered “elect”. But what is the language of God of Christians and therefore the perfect language at least for Christians?

      To find this language, we have to go and look for it in the “foundations” of the Christian world … At the “foundations” of the Western World.

      Why should we do that? Why are the founders of the Christian world very specific … They are those whom the Western World knows as God-men … They are the ones who, in their presence on Earth, acted in a very specific way and initiated developments … It is those who, as men, acted – but talked – in their own way and thus in their own language … in the language of their own, and hence in the language of their Father … In the Language of God.

      They do not need special skills or expertise to locate the language of God of Christianity and thus of the Western World.

      Who are the founders of the Western World? … His gods, literally and metaphorically … His Gods, who are not related to the other religions of the Far East or Africa … The only people in Western history who have been worshiped as the Godfathers. .The Greek Alexander and the Jewish Jesus.

      In what language did these two speak? Alexander, as a Greek, was natural to speak Greek. Jesus; … Jesus also spoke Greek and thus in Greek he delivered the Chapter of His Knowledge. It was not possible at the time when the greatest spiritual battle in the history of mankind was given to the God’s Son to pursue triumph and speak a poorer language. In the time of Jesus, the Hellenization of the world of the Eastern Mediterranean was so “profound”, that only the sheperds and deserters o did not know Greek. Whoever wanted to either trade or engage in any kind of civil activity, had to know Greek. Even the fanatic Jews were largely Greek-speaking.

  148. avatar
    Matt Czapliński

    English. It’s a most spoken second language in EU grouping by countries. In fact in order to write my opinion in here I am using English though it is not my primary language. Many in here also do not use any other languages than English. World is also not ending on Europe. There are approximately 200 other countries in the world to make a business with, and in which you can always find someone talking in English.

    I’m currently in Bogota, Colombia where primary is spanish but many people do speak communicative English. In many other countries English is the first language you can communicate in as a foreigner/tourist/business making guy/whatever.

    By trying to switch to other languages Europe would definitely move backward. In my opinion it would also bring up a questions about “why”. Why would one need to learn French, German or Spanish for example if he/she has his/her mother tongue already? Would it be just because someone said “ok Europe, no English now, let’s switch to German”. More confusion would bring up a rise of nationalism around Europe. Also there are other potential costs like changing signs e.g. in museums, educational systems, programs (I can’t imagine to work in other language as a programmer or economist, than in English).

    Also, there are several studies that already have proven that English is easiest language to learn as it has most of words that are already in use in different languages.

    Given these facts I think that yes, we should use English as a second language :)

  149. avatar
    George Frehden

    Turkish will be a good choice , try it as a second language, or for long term arabic will be third language!

  150. avatar
    Zeljka Jeramaz

    It is so much easier to learn English than for example German, French or Polish. So it should stay official language.

  151. avatar
    Ian Gurney

    See my Facebook ‘About Me’ section, this article is a good opportunity for me to reiterate one of my views :-
    Eartharian (International English Language should be relabelled ‘Eartharian’)
    Note: As the language currently stands is imperfect, there is still vast room for improvement, hopefully we the humans of the planet earth can together improve it.

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