UniversitiesTo cut or not to cut? That is the question. Or rather – the question is one of degrees. Most would agree that budgets need to be trimmed right now, but if the cuts go too deep, will we be putting Europe’s recovery at risk? And are education budgets one of the areas that should be protected? Debating Europe recently spoke to Ruairi Quinn, Irish Minister for Education and Skills, and asked him about education in Europe.

We had a suggestion sent in by the European Students’ Union expressing concerns over public spending cuts in higher education. Their argument was that education is one area where investment is vital and short-term cuts could damage the future of European countries. Should we not freeze current levels of investment in higher education?

I would be concerned, first and foremost, that we would have a clear understanding of value for money in education. There is concern, for example, in my own country that the resources being used are used efficiently. The quality of education provision is currently uneven. So, extra resources in a time of austerity is an easy catchcry, but value for money is what’s really important.

We also had a suggestion from Riccardo Perissich, the Former Director General for Industry in the European Commission, arguing that the “Swiss” education model might be interesting for the EU. He points out that education in Switzerland is carried out at the level of the canton, but that there are certain institutions that are run by the federal government. He wondered if we might see the development of “centres of excellence” in research and asked if it was utopian to propose that some of them be considered “federal” institutions in the mould of the Zurich Polytechnic?

No, it’s not. And I think it’s the way European education has to go. The QS index ranks the top universities in the world. It’s very significant for me that so many of the top 100 universities were from the US. That, in itself, is an indication that there has to be better cooperation between European institutions and we should promote and encourage and, indeed, incentivise collaboration between universities across frontiers. A lot of this is happening anyway. So, the infrastructure is increasingly more supportive, but it does need further effort.

The Erasmus programme is widely seen as a success, but we had another suggestion from Mr Perissich that it should be made more general and, possibly, even made compulsory for young people to study abroad. In Austria, Switzerland and, until recently, Germany, young people can fulfill their national service obligations through social work. Shouldn’t all young people have the opportunity to study abroad?

Well, in terms of enlarging Erasmus, I would strongly support that. There are obviously logistical considerations, of course. But it would certainly help to foster stronger ties. When I was a young person there was French pop music, Spanish pop music, Irish pop music, etc. Now there’s just pop music. All of that has been integrated in an effortless way through globalisation, so young people in particular are familiar with this global culture.

Well, it’s interesting you should mention pop music, because English is increasingly becoming the language of choice when it comes to pop. On the other hand, we’ve been having a lively discussion on Debating Europe about whether or not Esperanto should be taught in schools across Europe.

I don’t think a modern version of Esperanto is a realistic prospect anymore. The history of Esperanto and its failure to catch fire is well-documented. On the other hand, some languages have excelled at becoming very international. English, as the most obvious example, has become very international – not least because a lot of entertainment in English is subtitled internationally. The second biggest language in the world internationally after English is Spanish.

So, I think realistically every European should learn a second language. The problem is not people having English as a second language. The problem is most English speakers have no other language.

Vote 2014

Voting is closed in our Debating Europe Vote 2014! The results are now in, so come and see what our readers thought!




70 comments Post a commentcomment

What do YOU think? Do you think funding for higher education should be cut? Do you agree that there should be more cooperation between higher education institutes at the European level? Do you agree that Esperanto is not a realistic prospect because it failed to "catch fire"? Let us know your comments in the form below and we'll take them to experts and policy-makers for their reactions.

  1. avatar
    Karsten Lucke

    I already posted in May the proposal to include “European education” into the school curriculum to achieve a sustainable European education for the younger generation. This has nothing to do with fighting non-formal European education. But implementing interdisciplinary European education for all pupils would be a huge step forward!

    Read more on my blog

    • avatar
      Giorgio

      An interesting proposal – but what would it teach? History? This is a contentious subject. History maybe divides us more than it unites us. Institutional structure of the UE? This is not exactly so exciting.

      Finally, curriculums are set by member-states, and I do not think people will be so happy to give up this right.

  2. avatar
    Bill Chapman

    Ruairi Quinn is misinformed when he says: “I don’t think a modern version of Esperanto is a realistic prospect anymore. The history of Esperanto and its failure to catch fire is well-documented.”

    Firstly, he use of the term “a modern version of Esperanto” suggests that he is not aware that there is only one Esperanto, which is a lively young langauage, which does not need to be modernised. Secondly, he might oblige us by telling us where “its failure to catch fire” is documented. Esperanto has been a remarkable grass-roots success story, in my view.

  3. avatar
    Laszlo Szemelyi

    I think education is the most secure long-term investment ever. Several economic analytic approach proved that. The real question should be, what is an optimal distribution of money across levels and areas of education? An educated carpenter or plumber can be more important in some cases than a financial expert, and we can spend a fortune on higher education without much return if many of the applicants are functional analphabets…

    24/06/2013 Ruairí Quinn, Irish Minister for Education and Skills, has responded to this comment.

  4. avatar
    Christos Mouzeviris

    A very interesting proposal..A Swiss model of education? Great! Bring it on! I would also like to add (from comments of others) that it should definitely teach European among our national history. We must get to know each other better and have a collective knowledge of our past, but also create a sense of common roots..I will also suggest that during the last year of school in each country, before students become either students in Universities or citizens in our countries, we should teach them their rights and obligations as citizens of the state they live in, but also as EU citizens! Most people I know do not know their rights as EU citizens! Nor the opportunities that it offers, or how to make the best of their EU citizenship! So why not prepare them to be better Hungarian, Polish, Spanish, Swedish or Greek citizens for example, but also EU citizens? And send them out to our society prepared and fully aware! Just a thought!

  5. avatar
    Thanos Spyropoulos

    Education should be protected from spending cuts that’s my opinion. Education is the most important think that we have and should be appreciated accordingly from the EU and the member states. Students should learn our common European history and also global history. I support that students should learn not only one second language but two. I also support the learning of philosophy starting from the ancients Greeks which will help the student ubderstand better the ideas that have created our common western civilisation. The Erasmus program should also been strengthened i agree. Leaving your home country to study abroad is a strengthening experience that more and more people should experience. Europe should protect education and increase its budget.

    25/06/2013 Ruairí Quinn, Irish Minister for Education and Skills, has responded to this comment.

  6. avatar
    Peter

    The EU education system should look like a charter between our young generation with industry. Hence, we should consider reorganizing our entire education system in such a way that students leave the education cycle with a job and a degree. So, what is more important: a job or a degree? I would say give them both at the same time! Hence, the schooling system must be directly linked in a strong, mutually beneficial partnership with business and industry as well as the politics (government). Inline with the Swiss system the EU could have a corporate (Erasmus) structure and the local regional governments a local tightly nit partnership with the local industry. After all 3 out of the 5 current jobs had no curriculum before as they have emerged from the business and industrial needs as they develop. There is a gap between progress in education and progress in industry, with education losing out. There is the need to focus more on cognitive power rather then intellectual power alone. By freeing up the defense budget the EU can easily dedicate 8 to 9% GDP to education R&D,I. The only way to sustain prosperity without growth is by investing in innovation, starting with education. Hence, no cuts or freeze, on the contrary! With it’s strong background and experience Europe can do this and thus remain a global powerhouse in a global environment where specialization and niches will prevail. English as second language remains the preferred choice.

    27/06/2013 Ruairí Quinn, Irish Minister for Education and Skills, has responded to this comment.

  7. avatar
    Peter Schellinck

    The EU education system should look like a charter between our young generation with industry. Hence, we should consider reorganizing our entire education system in such a way that students leave the education cycle with a job and a degree. So, what is more important: a job or a degree? I would say give them both at the same time! Hence, the schooling system must be directly linked in a strong, mutually beneficial partnership with business and industry as well as the politics (government). Inline with the Swiss system the EU could have a corporate (Erasmus) structure and the local regional governments a local tightly nit partnership with the local industry. After all 3 out of the 5 current jobs had no curriculum before as they have emerged from the business and industrial needs as they develop. There is a gap between progress in education and progress in industry, with education losing out. There is the need to focus more on cognitive power rather then intellectual power alone. By freeing up the defense budget the EU can easily dedicate 8 to 9% GDP to education R&D,I. The only way to sustain prosperity without growth is by investing in innovation, starting with education. Hence, no cuts or freeze, on the contrary! With it’s strong background and experience Europe can do this and thus remain a global powerhouse in a global environment where specialization and niches will prevail. English as second language remains the preferred choice.

  8. avatar
    Nico Keppens

    As -few- others said on this issue: the educations system has to provide a good mixture between education that offers what is called intellectual knowledge and education that is more job oriented. People with all kind of knowledge and people to do the most difficult and/or dirty jobs are needed within a society. The available resources should be distributed according to needs.

    But the main problem is what comes after the education. There should be more equal respect for these different types of needs. I agree that knowledge and innovation are necessary (preferably to allow a sustainable growth, not only to enhance consumerism). However, the almost sole intrest in and communication about the knowledge based society is in my view one of the reasons of many people within the EU loosing ‘contact’ with the European project. In reality let’s say 60% of the population is – for many reasons – not capable of getting one or more university degrees. They feel abandoned if no attention goes to their input in society, to the knowledge they acquire doing their job. They see that their efforts are considered financially much lower (and the distance gets even larger) than the ones from the people who they perceive as getting already that much help paid by tax payers (=by them).

    This is not an appeal for a system wherein everyone should be equal, because that doesn’t work. It asks for a society wherein all are stimulated to do the most with their capacities and wherein rewarding happens according to the amount of work delivered and to its contribution to the society, with a guarantee that everyone has at least enough to cover basic needs.

  9. avatar
    Muneeb Farooq

    Europe is an economic hub and a major market for industries of the world. The recent economic crisis is giving a jerk to its stability. Education is and has always provided solutions for all the social and economic problems. There is a need to enhance the current educational system with the aspects of innovation and induced creativity in the students to develop sustainability potentials in their career and future which will in turn flourish the prospects of changing and strengthing the panoramic views of the european youth. Induce in them a great deal of acumen for the betterment and the innovation of new, dynamic ideas for change and globalisation.

    26/06/2013 Ruairí Quinn, Irish Minister for Education and Skills, has responded to this comment.

  10. avatar
    effie exarchoulakou

    european education represenets our culture but global information gave us the right to be europan citizens of the world

  11. avatar
    Poyi Liu

    So true. Not everyone is fit for the academic route, but universities continue to train students to go down that path.

  12. avatar
    Davey Brown

    How about “the truth”? But then again if it was the truth it wouldnt be European ” education”. (Indoctrination in non newspeak English)

  13. avatar
    Tom Collin

    prioritise 3Dprinting, fusion, open source administration and apply absolute recycling (optimal with 3Dprinting industry)

  14. avatar
    Tom Collin

    Reroute 50% of security and defence funding to education and R&D. Kick off the SPACE AGE. There is no alternative and you know it

  15. avatar
    SianClaire

    Economist Professor Enrico Colombatto, from the University of Turin, Italy recently wrote in WorldReview.info that educational reform in Europe is crucial for the future performance of our economies. Professor Colombatto argues that many students leave education too late, and many lack the skills and knowledge that the labour market requires. One solution may be to privatise education so teachers are evaluated by families (i.e., consumers) rather than by state agencies. Schools should also encourage entrepreneurship to provide young people with the ability to learn and accept risk.
    http://www.worldreview.info/content/matching-education-needs-europes-business

  16. avatar
    Panagiotis Mentesidis

    I have some questions for the European policy makers. Basically do you think that applying university fees creates social inequality and excludes people from participating in higher education creating social pariahs and what is the EU prepared to do in order to provide to all social classes the ability to pursue an academic carrier?
    Education is becoming more and more expensive and the prospect of finding a job afterwards is vanishing, I believe that if funding is given to the hard sciences Europe will have the edge but the current economic crisis is cutting funds from education and health in order to save failed private coorpations such as banks at what point will the European policy makers and politicians begin to understand how unethical and dangerous this is for the future of Europe and the generations to come?
    Are politicians prepared to have a clash with big buisness in order to sustain our welfare state and free eduaction, can they stop the deconstruction of the middle classes?
    Sorry if my questions are too many I realise that the point is education but I believe that everything starts from education.

  17. avatar
    Wolfgang G. Wettach

    My 13year old says: “Ja”. I asked her in english, she answered in German, she also learns Latin and French. As a third foreign language everyone could learn something easy (like Esperanto, where grammar is done in 1h) or something more special, like Cymraeg (Living Welsh), Galego or Russian.

  18. avatar
    Wolfgang G. Wettach

    My 13year old says: “Ja”. I asked her in english, she answered in German, she also learns Latin and French. As a third foreign language everyone could learn something easy (like Esperanto, where grammar is done in 1h) or something more special, like Cymraeg (Living Welsh), Galego or Russian.

  19. avatar
    Juan Vázquez García

    No. The government can’t force me to learn another language if I don’t want to. Everybody should just know how to speak the language of their country and then learn another one, but that’s if they want to do so. Learning languages is overrated. You just learn how to state the same things in other languages. More emphasis should be put on the quality of the speech and not the format.

  20. avatar
    Juan Vázquez García

    No. The government can’t force me to learn another language if I don’t want to. Everybody should just know how to speak the language of their country and then learn another one, but that’s if they want to do so. Learning languages is overrated. You just learn how to state the same things in other languages. More emphasis should be put on the quality of the speech and not the format.

  21. avatar
    Raphael Döhr

    There is a system of education which is very close to what an European Education would look like. French schools in Germany offer a double German/French Baccalauréat/Abitur. I guess it is also like that with other French Schools in the UK, Italy, Spain etc… If an european education would look like something, then it would be this.

  22. avatar
    Vicente Silva Tavares

    For the future of Europe, it would be good if we had all a common language. As cannot be any of an existing country because of national prejudices, I only see Latin as an option. Even though I speak 4 languages.

  23. avatar
    Vicente Silva Tavares

    For the future of Europe, it would be good if we had all a common language. As cannot be any of an existing country because of national prejudices, I only see Latin as an option. Even though I speak 4 languages.

  24. avatar
    Wilson Abreu

    EU and member countries need to be pragmatic. To develop a competitive Europe it should be compulsory to develop courses and Curricular Units in English, namely at the University level. Please pay attention to the Scandinavian countries. The best EU Universities are offering english taught courses (not only PhD, of course).

  25. avatar
    Wilson Abreu

    EU and member countries need to be pragmatic. To develop a competitive Europe it should be compulsory to develop courses and Curricular Units in English, namely at the University level. Please pay attention to the Scandinavian countries. The best EU Universities are offering english taught courses (not only PhD, of course).

  26. avatar
    Rolando Van Velden

    let countries themselves arrange as much as possible, and what countries cannot do alone, let it be handled by the EU. Respect diversity between countries, and dont let Brussels control more than they should.

  27. avatar
    Rolando Van Velden

    let countries themselves arrange as much as possible, and what countries cannot do alone, let it be handled by the EU. Respect diversity between countries, and dont let Brussels control more than they should.

  28. avatar
    Christos Mouzeviris

    encourage thinking full-stop… dynamic or not.. our education system requires us to learn something by heart and then go and give exams the next day.. so if someone has a good memory he/she can get into the university and do well.. that is obviously not good enough… we do not create creative, free thinking people like this, that will contribute with ideas in our societies.. will they have good critical thinking, or dynamic thinking as you say to contribute or will they just be good enough to just about get a degree, not knowing what to do with it later on?

  29. avatar
    Christos Mouzeviris

    encourage thinking full-stop… dynamic or not.. our education system requires us to learn something by heart and then go and give exams the next day.. so if someone has a good memory he/she can get into the university and do well.. that is obviously not good enough… we do not create creative, free thinking people like this, that will contribute with ideas in our societies.. will they have good critical thinking, or dynamic thinking as you say to contribute or will they just be good enough to just about get a degree, not knowing what to do with it later on?

  30. avatar
    Ignacio C. Furfaro

    Education across the EU should be harmonized. In addition, all children in the EU should be taught at least two foreign languages: English and another EU one.

  31. avatar
    Ignacio C. Furfaro

    Education across the EU should be harmonized. In addition, all children in the EU should be taught at least two foreign languages: English and another EU one.

  32. avatar
    Mark Stockfisch

    In Germany a 2nd foreign language is already compulsory if you wanna enter 11th Class (mostly french, spanish, italian). Some learn a 3th foreign language. Germans are more competitive compared to spanish for instance.

  33. avatar
    Mark Stockfisch

    In Germany a 2nd foreign language is already compulsory if you wanna enter 11th Class (mostly french, spanish, italian). Some learn a 3th foreign language. Germans are more competitive compared to spanish for instance.

  34. avatar
    Tamás Heizler

    In Hungarian schools it’s also already compulsory to learn 2nd foreign language from the 9th year of public education except for vocational schools. (1st foreign language: 2nd yr – 10th yr, 2nd foreign language: 9th yr – 12 yr)

    On the other hand the fact is that a lot of people cannot even learn any of the foreign languages on a sufficient level. So my opinion is that we should more likely make attempts to teach English to every European children rather than teach 2 or 3 languages that they cannot learn. Better to have 90% that can talk in English than 20 percent that can talk in 3 languages, other 20 that can talk in 2 languages, other 20 that can talk in English and 40% that don’t speak any foreign languages although learnt 3 of them.

    So my opinion is that higher ranked schools really should teach at least 2 foreign languages. On the other hand low ranked schools should make effort to teach at least English to all the children. I think it would also be a good idea to organize a big pan-European English test for children finishing the 8th year of public education. And only those children should be let to learn a 2nd foreign language that have a sufficient level of English (maybe B1). Those who don’t have should take more English classes instead of second language. And then at the end of the 10th year there should be organized an other test. Those who pass that one would be let to learn a second foreign language in the last 2 years.

    So my opinion is that the crucial thing is to educate people all over Europe that can speak AT LEAST English.

  35. avatar
    Tamás Heizler

    In Hungarian schools it’s also already compulsory to learn 2nd foreign language from the 9th year of public education except for vocational schools. (1st foreign language: 2nd yr – 10th yr, 2nd foreign language: 9th yr – 12 yr)

    On the other hand the fact is that a lot of people cannot even learn any of the foreign languages on a sufficient level. So my opinion is that we should more likely make attempts to teach English to every European children rather than teach 2 or 3 languages that they cannot learn. Better to have 90% that can talk in English than 20 percent that can talk in 3 languages, other 20 that can talk in 2 languages, other 20 that can talk in English and 40% that don’t speak any foreign languages although learnt 3 of them.

    So my opinion is that higher ranked schools really should teach at least 2 foreign languages. On the other hand low ranked schools should make effort to teach at least English to all the children. I think it would also be a good idea to organize a big pan-European English test for children finishing the 8th year of public education. And only those children should be let to learn a 2nd foreign language that have a sufficient level of English (maybe B1). Those who don’t have should take more English classes instead of second language. And then at the end of the 10th year there should be organized an other test. Those who pass that one would be let to learn a second foreign language in the last 2 years.

    So my opinion is that the crucial thing is to educate people all over Europe that can speak AT LEAST English.

  36. avatar
    Tamás Heizler

    In Hungarian schools it’s also already compulsory to learn 2nd foreign language from the 9th year of public education except for vocational schools. (1st foreign language: 2nd yr – 10th yr, 2nd foreign language: 9th yr – 12 yr)

    On the other hand the fact is that a lot of people cannot even learn any of the foreign languages on a sufficient level. So my opinion is that we should more likely make attempts to teach English to every European children rather than teach 2 or 3 languages that they cannot learn. Better to have 90% that can talk in English than 20 percent that can talk in 3 languages, other 20 that can talk in 2 languages, other 20 that can talk in English and 40% that don’t speak any foreign languages although learnt 3 of them.

    So my opinion is that higher ranked schools really should teach at least 2 foreign languages. On the other hand low ranked schools should make effort to teach at least English to all the children. I think it would also be a good idea to organize a big pan-European English test for children finishing the 8th year of public education. And only those children should be let to learn a 2nd foreign language that have a sufficient level of English (maybe B1). Those who don’t have should take more English classes instead of second language. And then at the end of the 10th year there should be organized an other test. Those who pass that one would be let to learn a second foreign language in the last 2 years.

    So my opinion is that the crucial thing is to educate people all over Europe that can speak AT LEAST English.

  37. avatar
    Tamás Heizler

    Dear Ignacio C. Furfaro!
    I think the most important issue is to teach AT LEAST English to all the European children, because if everybody spoke at least English then every European would be able to understand each other.

    I think 2nd foreign language can be good and advantageous, but not crucial. So for this reason I think that in low ranked schools they should teach only English (even instead of the classes that would be for the 2nd foreign language). On the other hand in higher ranked schools they would be allowed to teach 2nd foreign language.

    My other idea to organize a centralized European English test for 8th graders and those who pass the test would be let to learn a 2nd foreign language from the 9th grade. However those whose don’t, would be taught more English in the same time when their fellow students are taught the 2nd foreign language.

    Today in Hungary from the 9th year of public education it’s compulsory to learn a 2nd foreign language, however a lot of people aren’t even able to learn 1 of them on a sufficient level, so I’m really just laughing when the State Secretary for Education of Hungary says that we should teach 3 or 4 languages in public schools. So we can say bigger and bigger numbers and we can dream about 2-3-4 language speaking children, and I’m pretty sure there would be children that are able to learn these languages. But we should rather focus on what is crucial for every European people. And that’s English. So first everyone should be able to speak English and THEN we can speak about 2nd, 3rd, 4th foreign languages.

  38. avatar
    Tamás Heizler

    Dear Ignacio C. Furfaro!
    I think the most important issue is to teach AT LEAST English to all the European children, because if everybody spoke at least English then every European would be able to understand each other.

    I think 2nd foreign language can be good and advantageous, but not crucial. So for this reason I think that in low ranked schools they should teach only English (even instead of the classes that would be for the 2nd foreign language). On the other hand in higher ranked schools they would be allowed to teach 2nd foreign language.

    My other idea to organize a centralized European English test for 8th graders and those who pass the test would be let to learn a 2nd foreign language from the 9th grade. However those whose don’t, would be taught more English in the same time when their fellow students are taught the 2nd foreign language.

    Today in Hungary from the 9th year of public education it’s compulsory to learn a 2nd foreign language, however a lot of people aren’t even able to learn 1 of them on a sufficient level, so I’m really just laughing when the State Secretary for Education of Hungary says that we should teach 3 or 4 languages in public schools. So we can say bigger and bigger numbers and we can dream about 2-3-4 language speaking children, and I’m pretty sure there would be children that are able to learn these languages. But we should rather focus on what is crucial for every European people. And that’s English. So first everyone should be able to speak English and THEN we can speak about 2nd, 3rd, 4th foreign languages.

  39. avatar
    David Eaton

    Europe needs to have a diverse education system catering for the needs and aspirations for every citizen. Education systems should be built around people not for the benefit of business but the benefit of society and the individual. So in short I do not think education and business should be better linked. To both Igncio and Tamas I would like to say every member state has a unique education system likewise every student learns differently while I see a benefit in a mandatory 2nd (or 3rd in Ireland) language for students it could prove counter active as some students have extreme difficulties learning languages. Also forcing language on to young people may force them to turn away completely from the task.

  40. avatar
    David Eaton

    Europe needs to have a diverse education system catering for the needs and aspirations for every citizen. Education systems should be built around people not for the benefit of business but the benefit of society and the individual. So in short I do not think education and business should be better linked. To both Igncio and Tamas I would like to say every member state has a unique education system likewise every student learns differently while I see a benefit in a mandatory 2nd (or 3rd in Ireland) language for students it could prove counter active as some students have extreme difficulties learning languages. Also forcing language on to young people may force them to turn away completely from the task.

  41. avatar
    Nikolaos Sotirelis

    Enough is enough! Education and knowledge are for people’s improvement and for society’s benefit. Not for a company’s profits.

  42. avatar
    Nikolaos Sotirelis

    Enough is enough! Education and knowledge are for people’s improvement and for society’s benefit. Not for a company’s profits.

  43. avatar
    Roland Knaap

    let those things that can be arranged at national level be arranged at national level and if things cannot be arranged at national level, only then arrange it at european level. This save costs, and respects the diversity within europe.

  44. avatar
    Roland Knaap

    let those things that can be arranged at national level be arranged at national level and if things cannot be arranged at national level, only then arrange it at european level. This save costs, and respects the diversity within europe.

  45. avatar
    Antinazi Archimedes

    Everything in Europe should be linked to the big corporation. After all, the EU is a union of pseudo democratic fascist countries waging war on it’s own citizens and participating in Anglo-American imperialism.

  46. avatar
    Antinazi Archimedes

    Everything in Europe should be linked to the big corporation. After all, the EU is a union of pseudo democratic fascist countries waging war on it’s own citizens and participating in Anglo-American imperialism.

  47. avatar
    Chará Boulá

    No, it shouldn’t. Not only that, but I believe that at 17 it’s too early for the majority of teens to choose a degree. A general college of 2 years and then university would be a better option, they would experience a variety of studies in a higher level and then they would be able to choose with much higher certainty. People need to find their own identity through education, whether it is in arts, humanities, science, etc… Everything is already too much business-oriented and over specialized, we end up seeing educated people with no basic general knowledge. People should first of all enjoy education and benefit from how it makes them feel and from the knowledge they gain, general first and then – IF chosen – specialised. An education system built to provide businesses with more “soldiers” would only benefit the businesses, not the individuals because it will eventually deprive them from creativity, from modules that focus more on humanities, arts which are not considered so valuable from businesses. Also, in a continent with so much variety of mentalities and cultures, a unified EU system shouldn’t be an option. A set of common minimum quality standards yes, but a unified education system, no way. Each country needs to be able to adapt its education system to its uniqueness and cultural identity.

  48. avatar
    Chará Boulá

    I agree with George K Georgiou. Creative thinking is what is needed. People to be able and allowed to think of ideas outside of the box. Dynamic thinking isn’t always creative thinking.

  49. avatar
    ewropano

    The first question to answer is: Education what for? There is no consensus in EU about the aims of education: To make profitable workers or responsible citizens able to understand and to manage the challenges of present and future world?

Your email will not be published

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Notify me of new comments. You can also subscribe without commenting.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

By continuing to use this website, you consent to the use of cookies on your device as described in our Privacy Policy unless you have disabled them. You can change your cookie settings at any time but parts of our site will not function correctly without them.